Kaiidth

One of the earliest concepts Surak taught to his followers was kaiidth, which is traditionally translated into Federation Standard English as simply What is, is. Another informal and more descriptive translation is Let go and go with the flow. If one looks for an equivalent in human philosophy, it can be found in the traditions of Taoism and the words of Lao-tzu in the 76th verse of the Tao Te Ching: “An army that cannot yield will be defeated. A tree that cannot bend will crack in the wind.”

He defined kaiidth in Part Six of the Second Analects, which you can read here: https://kirshara.wordpress.com/second-analects/

Vocalist and ka’athaira player T’Prion has put Surak’s discussion of kaiidth to music, offered here in this video. We hope you find it satisfactory. Below, you’ll find the lyrics in Modern Golic Vulcan and a translation into FSE.

KAIIDTH

Nam-tor nash kaiidth

Ken-tor hagik tanafsular heh teransular rata t’kaiidth.
Is-tor au ish-veh svi’fereikanlar rik hokni-nahp.
Veshtau ruhm dan-tanafsular kisheyalar.
Puhuplamau kras. Pupluhnkau masu.
Zatrasha ozhlar nayik kurayalar.
Tusa ein-tanafsular, dva-tor ta puyigahdau fereikan.
Hi nunau yeht-tanafsu kras-thezh,
masu-ulidar, il kuraya vi’bikuv.

Nam-tor nash kaiidth.

Trel-tor ozhlar t’teransu fi’ka’athaira
eh mavau sa-veh ralash-pitohlar ik ri wedzh-tor sa-veh.
Kuv vesht fa-wak saven-tor sa-veh teran,
lau aisha tchachaik’es fa’orensular sa-veh yar-kurau.
Hi kal-tor yeht-teransu ralash-pitohlar
kisheik kakhartau teran na’ek-uzh-kharat.
Nazh-tor ralvatif uzh-set’ko
eh nam-tor ish-veh weh-rom fna’riyeht-ralash-pitohlar.

Nam-tor nash kaiidth.

Fai-tor rom-masu-halsu ta kuv puk-tor ish-veh tehn’nepilash,
fa-wak shetau ish-veh maut-zungor heh mastevau.
Hi kuv ri shetau ish-veh pahthik,
fa-wak kup masu-hal-tor ish-veh na’vla eh fun-tor hagik na’gef.
Tvai kaiidth kal-tor hal-tor heh kal-tor lesh pilash t’ha’kiv etek.
Vun nar-tor etek ta fa-wak katau ish-veh etek
na’ridvuyan-masular wilat fa-wak
tihetilau ha-pavek k’ten t’urgam.

Nam-tor nash kaiidth.

WHAT IS IS

This is kaiidth.

Artists and composers easily grasp the concept of kaiidth.
They use it in their creations without conscious thought.
Even the best painters experience accidents.
Paint is spilled. Water is splashed.
Eager fingers leave stains.
Some artists weep, believe their work is ruined.
But the true artist fits the paint-drip,
watermark, or stain into the picture.

This is kaiidth.

The composer’s fingers slip on the ka’athaira
and he plays notes that he did not intend.
If he were teaching composition, his awkwardness in front of students
may cause him to turn green [with embarrassment].
But the true composer allows the accidental notes
to guide his composition towards a whole new direction.
The melody gains new interest
and is better for the wrong notes.

This is kaiidth.

The good swimmer knows that if he fights against the rip current,
he will exhaust himself and drown.
But if he does not panic,
he will be able to swim to the side and return to the shore with ease.
Kaiidth means letting go and allowing the current of life to carry us.
We must accept that it will bring us
to the still waters
where the situation will stabilize with less effort.

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To Understand without Knowing

Art by Jonliza Velox

Art by Jonliza Velox

Ken-tor rik’faiyan. The phrase comes from Dahr-Krus, or Part Two, of Surak’s Analects. In it, Surak considers the subject of epistemology, or how we know what we know. He wrestles through the systems of knowledge prominent on Vulcan in his day, including: 1) empiricism – the insistence that all knowledge is derived from sensory experience; 2) rationalism – the doctrine that knowledge (and ultimately, truth) must be tested by intellect and deductive reasoning ; 3) the scientific method – the rigorous discipline which combines and utilizes both empiricism and rationalism in the pursuit of knowledge and truth; and authoritarianism – the acceptance of knowledge and the truth of ideas asserted by an unquestionable authority.

He concludes that all these systems have their place in the daily quest for knowledge but that none are satisfactory for developing understanding. “Wide experience increases wisdom,” he said, “but to know the ultimate truth, we must transcend knowledge.” It was this assertion that won him favor with the priests of the Suta Temple in Shi’Kahr, and it was there on the ancient steps that he first began to teach a new philosophy to a wide audience. Before the Awakening, Vulcan monasteries were institutions of peace, as they remain today, but they were closed to all but the initiated. Before Surak, holy men and women practiced isolationism, removing themselves from the violence of the day behind thick walls. They had little hope the average Vulcan could live in peace, but when Surak began to advocate the strict control of emotions, the priests of the Suta Temple thought he was onto something.

Since that time, Vulcan philosophers, priests, linguists, scientists, and educators continued to debate what the phrase “to understand without knowing” means. One renowned voice in the debate was Professor Aravik who taught music and psychology at the Vulcan Science Academy. He was particularly interested in how the brain processes, stores, and retrieves information. He recognized that the unconsciousness stored a vast amount of information that was more readily retrieved when paired with a musical phrase, which acted as a trigger. Working with psychologists and musicians at the VSA, he developed a musical style call tumaun-ralash-tanaf, or “programming music.”  The technique involves creating a meaningful word-phrase that embodies a concept, construct, lesson, method, or any subject matter the student wishes to master. The word-phrase is then paired with a simple but memorable musical phrase, which is repeated at predetermined intervals in the learning process. Dr. Aravik discovered that his subjects – students who were required to master vast sequences of equations or to recall lengthy passages of scientific theorem or legal doctrine – improved their recall ability on exams by 96.78% when the material was paired with tumaun-ralash-tanaf. The musical phrase alone (without what he termed the “word-crutch”) became for the student a key that unlocked the unconscious mind where a large amount of the memorized information was stored. “Music,” he wrote in one of his reports, “enters the brains at a deeper level than language. Music acts as a trigger for our deepest memories and can access that part of the brain where information once thought to be irretrievable by normal methods of recall is easily, quickly, and precisely brought into the conscious mind.” (Aravik, 2423, p. 16)

Modern Vulcan education employs tumaun-ralash-tanaf at all levels, from the primary learning pods through the doctoral dissertation. To this day, the Vulcan ability of extraordinary recall continues to amaze non-Vulcans throughout the galaxy. Many species have requested the use of the technique for their own educational programs. Vulcan scientists, however, are reluctant to share the procedure since the Vulcan mind does not exhibit the same structure as the brains of similar humanoid species. Even other Vulcanoids, such as Romulans, have a remarkably different brain structure from modern Vulcans. The teachings of Surak and the discipline adhered to for the last two millennia are partly responsible for the development of the modern Vulcan mind.

The following is a sample of tumaun-ralash-tanaf in a song composed and sung by T’Prion. The phrase ken-tor rik’faiyan, “to understand without knowing,” is used by followers of Surak, often with the guidance of a priestess or other instructor, to reach a deeper level of consciousness in meditation and to commit Surak’s teachings to memory.

Ken-tor rik’faiyan video

Here are the lyrics in Modern Golic Vulcan and in Federation Standard English:

Ken-tor rik’faiyan lyrics  (Art by Jonliza Velox)

SOURCES

Aravik & Sern. (2422). Learning and the control of behavior: principles, theories, and application of operant conditioning. Shi’Kahr: Vulcan Science Academy Press.

Aravik. (2423). Learning in a new key: a study in the application of music and its effect on cognitive processing and recall. Journal of Vulcan Cognition, 45(2), 12-36.

To read a selection of Aravik’s work, click on this link:

http://korsaya.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Tumaun-ralash-tanaf.pdf

Join the Forum at Korsaya.org to discuss this work and many other topics regarding Vulcan culture and language.

 

 

You and I Have Learned

The death of beloved actor Leonard Nimoy did not come as a

Photo by T'Prion

Photo by T’Prion

shock. He was, after all, a man of advanced age and ill health. It was a logical end of a life thoroughly lived, enjoyed, and shared – a life of creativity, reflection, and learning. These virtues were devoted to developing the Vulcan character the world came to love and the culture he represented – both material and moral.

As an actor, poet, and photographer, Nimoy shared much of himself with the world – and never more so than within his portrayal of Spock, the archetype by which all other Vulcan characters have been measured since. He was the first and the last – the end and the beginning.

Although the melding of actor and character was uncomfortable at times for Nimoy, he expressed sincere gratitude for his involvement with the Vulcan. “Because of him, I’ve had a number of wonderful opportunities. And I’d like to think that, just as his Vulcan logic has had a tempering effect on me, my emotional human personality has rubbed off on him a bit. I know we’ve both matured and mellowed a great deal over these three decades.” Nimoy went on in his autobiography to tell Spock, “We’re both very lucky — lucky to have had each other.” Instead of expounding on the nature of luck versus statistics, Spock softly agrees, “Yes, I suppose we have.”1

For Vulcans, whose greatest love is learning and the accompanying growth of intellect and spirit, life is one big classroom. At the end of a life well-lived, a Vulcan should be able to look back and reflect upon all that has been learned. Nimoy did this simply and succinctly in one of his poems called You and I Have Learned, originally published in 19812 and shared again with the world on Twitter3 five days before his death. He wanted to remind us of the important gift we all possess – a gift he shared with the world through Spock – a gift he wanted to remind each of us to share.

To that end, we offer here You and I Have Learned translated into Modern Golic Vulcan in a video tribute to the honored Mr. Nimoy. Light with him always…and with us.4

http://youtu.be/eWwBeTRalqk

 

SOURCES

1Nimoy, L. (1995). I am Spock. New York: Hyperion, p. 11.

2Nimoy, L. (1981). These Words are for You. Boulder, CO: Blue Mountain Press.

3Nimoy, L. (2015, February 22). You and I Have Learned [Twitter]. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/TheRealNimoy

4Sarek offered this blessing to T’Pau on the scattering of her ashes. Duane, D. (1988). Spock’s World. New York: Pocket Books, p. 296.

Now We Shape the Wind

With the recovery of the Kir’Shara, containing the original teachingsT'Prion
of Surak, and the destruction of the Vulcan homeworld (T’Khasi), much study has been devoted recently to pre-Reform civilization – the Vulcan that existed before Surakian philosophy and discipline were widely accepted. The purpose of this intense study by surviving scholars serves not only to assist in the restoration of Vulcan society but also to provide assurance that it will continue into the future. It was not long ago that the biological and cultural connection between Vulcans and Romulans was kept secret – a secret that was nearly lost. During the time of the Sundering, those who rejected Surak left T’Khasi to found a homeworld on a distant planet. They continued on as pre-Reform Vulcans and developed a new civilization in which emotions went unchecked.

Now Vulcans are once again faced with rebuilding, restructuring, and preserving their society. By studying Vulcan’s past, her people will not be doomed to repeat its violence.

One of the more fascinating aspects of this project is the ancient wisdom that comes to light. As archival networks, databases, and primary source documents are recovered, examined, and restored, many facets of former Vulcan life – most unfamiliar to the modern Vulcan – are made available again for public analysis and consideration. Files and manuscripts that have long been forgotten or even lost are now coming again to the forefront.

One study currently under investigation is the music – passed down from generation to generation in a wholly oral fashion – preserved through Vulcan’s monastic tradition. The College of Historical Studies of the Vulcan Science Academy has contracted with singer/songwriter T’Prion, to study a cache of newly discovered journals and documents, and to compose new material encompassing sacred traditions.

To hear the first of these compositions, click on this link:

http://youtu.be/DqGrsQuuS5E

Lyrics in both Vuhlkansu and Federation Standard English are provided here:

Lyrics in Vulcan                                     Lyrics in English

The song I’kushizhau etek salan (Now We Shape the Wind), composed and sung by T’Prion, is based on three distinct musical traditions. The oldest, zhit-ralash-tanaf (word-music) is a spontaneous style performed only by priestesses, who received their inspiration from sacred texts. Here, T’Prion focused on the text of Part One of Surak’s First Analects. The words convey the struggle for survival in Vulcan’s harsh climate, the endless battles for precious resources and wars that nearly destroyed the planet, and the philosophy that saved it. I’kushizhau etek salan encapsulates the evolution of the Vulcan species.

The song also builds upon the tradition of shean-ralash (rising-sound). The key of each succeeding stanza is raised by a step or half-step, gradually elevating the song to the heavens.

The third musical tradition T’Prion studied for this composition is uralal-varlar (sung-stories), a type of narrative singing used for epic poems and heroic tales. Each of these traditions can be explored more fully in the writings of T’Prion. As the documents and translations become available, links will be provided here. Read the original Modern Golic Vulcan transcriptions of these writings and join the discussion:

http://korsaya.org/forum/?mingleforumaction=viewtopic&t=62.0

The images in the video accompanying I’kushizhau etek salan are ancient holo-images of Raalan life, dating to the Second Dynasty, restored here in two-dimensional format. The chimes heard at the end are believed to from the T’Shen Monastery.

A List of Vulcan Names

As promised, we’re finishing up our discussion of Vulcan personal names with a list of the most common and notable names throughout history, along with their etymology and meaning. The list is broken up, alphabetically,  into three sections: A-R, T-Z, with separate lists for names starting with S and names containing the T’ prefix — as is common for Vulcan directories.

This list is by no means comprehensive and will be updated as time allows. If you’re interested in the etymology or meaning of a name that does not appear on this list, or if you’d like to know the source for a particular name, please feel free to email me. Some meanings are rather obscure, especially to offworlders, and I may be able to shed some additional light on certain traditions. I welcome your inquiries: sidzhan.tgai@gmail.com

NAMES A- R, T-Z

FEDERATION STANDARD

GOLIC VULCAN

DERIVED MEANING

Adenkar

adun karik

“strong husband”

Alieth

al’rig-pseth

“desert-branch”

Aloran

ashal-orensu

“beloved student”

Anauk

ha nauk

“cries vigorously”

Aravik

arev vik

“desert-wind well”

Arev

arev

“desert wind”

Asil

asal

“morning”

Avarak

aber-rok

“one who raises hope”

Avarin

aber+in

“one who lifts/raises”

Awidat

vakh wi datorik

“bold yet prepared”

Ayhan

vai yon

“holy fire”

Azeraik

az’ir-vaikar

“devoted mate”

Balev

ba-lahv

“traditional tongue”

Chu’lak

khau-lakh

“one who has command of language”

Delvok

dvelan vokaya

“will of memory”

Denak

dvinsu ekon-ak

“servant of the divine eye”

Dvir

duv-hirat

“crimson shadow”

Dzharok

dzhar-rok

“lay/song of hope”

Dzhossen

dvinsu zul-os-yon

“servant of the old lava fire”

Elieth

elik pseth

“free desert”

Elonat

el-on-natya

“both different and free”

Evekh

arev ekhlami

“surrounded by desert wind”

Evoras

arev vohris

“desert breeze”

Falor

fal+tor

“one who makes hot; bellows-worker”

Fer’at

feretausu

“gatherer”

Galsh

gal-en-shi

(from the) “moss place”

Grake

grei-faitik

“esoteric”

Grelek

kril’es-ek

“total harmony”

Haadok

ha-dahkuh

“two-life; twin”

Hanesh

feihan eshikh

“boss of the desert”

Harauk

ha taurauk

“amazing life”

Iria

hirat vre-ha

“crimson life-vessel”

Ivek

heya-vik

“mountain well”

Karatek

nakaratik

“endeavoring”

Kawarda

kahwa’ra-de

“similar mind;” name given to a twin

Kerak

k’yerak

“with bowl” (i.e., one who won’t go hungry)

Kesh

rik’esh

“without breath”

Kiri-kin-tha

kiri-kin than-tha

“golden one from Kir who guides children through their first meld”

Koss

rik’koshvar

“without disaster”

Kov

kov

“stone”

Kovar

kov ar’kadan

“stone worker”

Kuvak

ku vakh

“bold palm”

L’Nel

leshu nel-dath

“bearer of the pattern”

L’Vor

leshu va’orenan

“bearer of infinite learning”

Ladok

la dvin-tor oekon

“here serves the honorable god”

Lerius

leshu e’rroi’es

“bearer of attraction”

Lhai

leshu hai-fan

“banner carrier”

Lodzhal

leshu ozhika ashal

“bearer of beloved logic”

Lorian

leshu ro’fori+an

“bearer of information”

Lorot

leshu ro’fori ovsot

“bearer of complete information”

Lovar

lofik ar’kadan

“purposeful worker”

Lyras

lesh zherka hasu

“being who carries emotion”

M’Fau

maat fau

“clan who rides; The Riders”

Mahak

mahvel+ak

“hammer-like”

Menos

menal os

“(from the ) old cliff”

Mestral

mes-tor ye-halek

“one who crosses the galaxy”

Metana

maat-ta’an

“gift of the clan”

Mishih

mishitra hiyasu

“equipment expert”

Mitrani

m’aih toranik

“busy mother”

Muroc

mu-yor rok

“night hope”

N’Ereon

nei fer-yon

“seed of the fire-generation”

N’Evran

nei arev-rahm

“seed of the desert thunder-wind”

N’Keth

nei k’pseth

“desert seed”

N’Livek

nei li-wun-veh

“seed of the one with the lance”

N’Maret

nei mahr-ret

“seed of the market”

N’Oblan

nei opla-ang’dzhmizm

“seed of the honorable rear captain”

N’Rayek

nei Reah-yai-ek

“seed of Reah’s flame”

N’Vea

nei vi ha

“seed which is life”

N’Veyan

nei veh-yon

“seed of the flaming one”

Nesheh

veh neseshau

“one who deduces”

Nirak

nirak

“fool”

Nivol

nikh-vul

“eye-slant”

Nomikh

nei omekh

“seed of honorable parent”

Nu’Val

nei uzh-vahlsu

“seed of the new bestower”

Oratt

oradasu

“honorable spinner”

Paradaik

pa ra dakh

“the one around what is cast out”

Pekev

puhku gef

“(from the) amber coast”

Perren

perren

“actor”

Pola

po’lahv

“one who has the last word”

Prisu

prisu

“braider”

Radak

ra dak

“what is cast out”; an outcast

Radzhek

razhek

“awl”

Raelyek

Raal-yai-ek

“Raalan flame”

Ravanok

rarav-kanok

“every song”

Refas

Reah-vash

“Reah-terror”

Rekan

rehr-kan

“third child”

Romar

rom-ar’kadan

“good worker”

Rovalat

rok vahl lakht

“a grant of hope in the 10th month”

Tallera

talu lerash

“hard neck”

Talok

taluhk

“precious”

Tasav

tah-savas

“unobtainable fruit”

Taurik

taurau+ik

“amazing”

Tavek

tah va’khen

“unobtainable mountain raptor”

Tavin

t’avon

“of the hunger/famine”

Tekav

teker-khaf

“deviant blood”

Teknat

tehk-natya

“different sprout”

Telas

tel-hasu

“telepathic being”

Tellus

tel’es

“embodiment of the telepathic bond”

Tes

tesmur

“to prosper”

Teska

tehs-kau-bosh

“deceit-wise”

Tevik

dif-vik

“long-life well”

Tok

tok

“fine”

Tolaris

t’olara’es

“of the honorable blue” (house color)

Tolek

t’oluhk (maat)

“of the snake (clan)”

Torin

tor+in

“doer/ maker”

Tos

to-sai

“cloak/cloaked one”

Tu’Pari

tu pa’ritsuri

“the way around the unusual”

Turak

tu-rok

“way of hope”

Tuvok

tu va’khen

“way of the mountain raptor”

V’Lar

veh leshu a’riv’ne

“one who is bearer of a’riv’ne”

V’Las

veh leshu asenara

“one who is bearer of the lantern”

Vach

vakh

“bold”

Valeris

va’lerash’es

“immeasurable hardness”

Vanik

vaunik

“hesitant”

Varek

var+ek

“talkative”

Varekat

varu eik katausu

“broad storyteller”

Varen

aber+in; a variant of Avarin

“one who raises up”

Varith

var ithag

“story challenger/expert”

Vedzhat

veh-zad

“forbidden one”

Vektan

duvek ta’an

“shade gift”

Velekh

veh el’es ekhlami

“one surrounded by freedom”

Velik

velik

“simple/uncomplicated”

Verrin

ver-tor+in

“one who edits/editor”

Vethek

veh thek

“one who drops;” an indication of epilepsy

Vorant

vai oren-tor

“to learn (is) holy”

Vorealt

vohris ryll-torsu

“slow ryll-player;” a ryll is a ka’athaira, a Vulcan lute

Vorik

veh orfik-kel

“one of the ancestors; a throw-back”

Voris

vohris

“slow/methodical”

Vyorin

vi orenau

“one who studies”

Ych’a

yel tsatik

“secret star”

Yehenik

yai-enek

“fire-pain”

Yiluv

yel-ulef

“half-star”

Yuris

ur-is

“one who uses tunnels”

Zebed

za’bezhun

“behind-eye;” one who can see into the past or has “eyes” on the back of his head

Zerin

zeh-hir run

“onyx dream”

Zhi’rev

zhai arev

“grey wind”

NAMES starting with S

At the time of the Sundering, 28.6% of Vulcan’s population had taken S names to honor Surak.

S’harien

s’harr-igen

“from the tail of the sky (sun-tower)”

S’chn

s’khart-lan

“from the captain”

S’laron

s’lara-yon

“from the fire-bird”

S’lovan

s’lo’uk van-kal

“from the great ceremony”

S’rivas

s’ri’vas

“from no relief”

S’t’kal

s’t’sai kal’i

“from the lady of the challenge”

S’task

s’tcha-ihsek

“from the curling fog”

S’tvan

s’tviyan

“from the core”

S’vec

s’vik

“from the well”

S’wek

s’awek

“from out of solitude”

Saavik

sa’ahkh-vik

“from the well-war”

Sadzhik

sa’dzhasifik

“from out of jasif crystal”

Sakht

sakkhet

“longevity”

Sakkath

sakkhet-dath

“tendency towards longevity”

Sakonna

sakunotau

“one who extrapolates”

Sakorn

sakan oren

“spreading learning”

Salet

salatik

“indigenous/native”

Salkath

salan-k’rhth’a

“k’rhth’a- wind”; k’rhth’a is an herb

Salok

s’aluk (maat)

“from the fish (clan)”

Salvir

s’al vi ir

“from a distant male relative”

Sanshiin

sa(su)-na’shi’igen

“man at sky-place”

Sarda

sa-reldai

“priest”

Sarek

sahr ek’ariben’es

“fast fluency”

Sarissa

s’a’rs’a

“from the dance;” a dancer

Saros

s’arev-os

“from the old desert wind”

Sarpk

sahr pakashogaya

“fast perception”

Sasak

sa’sakkhet

“from out of longevity”

Sasek

sa’Seheikk’he

“away from the Sundred”

Sasav

sa’savas-shi

“from out of the fruit-place”

Satak

sa’i’hatik

“from out of the surviving”

Satat

sa’Tat’Sahr

“from out of Tat’Sahr”

Satelk

sa’telik

“from out of the bonded”

Satok

sa-tok

“fine male”

Savar

savarun

“digression”

Savel

sahriv-yel

“storm-star”

Savesh

sa’veshtaya

“outside of experience”

Saya

saya

“radiation/brilliance”

Scorus

ruskaraun’es

“embodiment of grasping”

Sefor

sef+tor

“dune-maker/shaper”

Segon

s’eik yon

“from the wide fire”

Sehlk

selk

“delta”

Sek

sek

“outlet/stream”

Sekir

s’sek-hirat

“from the crimson outlet/stream;”

Sekla

sek lamekh

“warm outlet/stream”

Selar

s’el-arev

“from the free desert wind”

Selden

s’el-tehnaya

“from the free resistance”

Selek

s’yel-ekon

“from the star-god”

Selik

s’yel i’ki

“from the soul of the star”

Selok

s’el-oekon

“from the free honorable god”

Selon

s’yel-yon

“from the star-fire”

Seltar

s’selk tor

“from the long delta”

Selv

s’el-veh

“from the free one”

Senak

senepa-ak

“knife-eye;” one who has a sharp eye

Sendet

senepa dator

“prepares senepa;” a knife-maker

Senek

senepa ekon

“knife god”

Senet

senepa-yeht

“knife-true”

Senkar

senepa kahr

“knife of the city”

Senor

seo’an+tor

“one who asserts”

Senva

senepa-vakh

“knife-bold”

Separ

senepa ar’kadan

“knife worker”

Sepek

sef-pelq

“dune captain”

Sepel

sep-wafikh el(ik)

“one who freely agrees

Sered

s’ir-ith’du

“from the distant camp”

Serevan

s’Reah van-kal

“from Reah’s ceremony”

Sern

asenara

“lantern”

Seroni

s’rom-nikh

“from the one with the good eye”

Sesenek

ses’ik ne ki’ne

“accountable sword-brother”

Setek

s’set-eik

“from the wide drop”

Sethan

s’pseth a’nirih

“from the desert father”

Sevennin

s’fen-igen

“from the sky-seal;” the Sky Clan used an emblem of the sky as their official seal.

Sev

seveh

“prosperity”

Sevek

seveh-ek

“total prosperity”

Sevel

seveh yel

“star of prosperity”

Seyhan

sihaunsu

“betting person”

Shanak

shan’hal’lak

“love at first-sight”

Shath

shen a’Tha

“ascent from the direct experience of the universe”

Shinat

s’shi Natara

“from the place of Natara” (god of water)

Shupal

shu-pal

“source”

Sidak

si’dahkuh

“from out of two”

Sidzhan

s’i’tsan

“from the bridge;” a reference to Seleya

Sihek

s’ihsek

“from the fog”

Sikan

s’ikun

“from the cone (volcano)”

Silek

si’lehk

“outside of ten;” a reference to the ten wells of the Shi’Kahr oasis

Silok

s’igen lo’uk

“from the great sky”

Simar

si’mahr

“outside the market”

Simora

si’mor-vakh

“outside bold leaf” (may refer to a place)

Sinak

s’igen-ak

“from the sky-eye” (a reference to T’Khut)

Sirak

s’irak-shi

“from the distant place”

Sirok

si’rok

“outside  hope”

Sitak

s’i’hatik

“from the surviving”

Sitar

s’itar-bosh

“from the thankful”

Sitok

s’igan tauk

“from the sky-cave”

Sivath

si’vath

“outside other;” outsider

Skamandros

skamau mamut-rushan

“one who attracts conversion-aid”

Skaren

s’ka-ran-zhi

“from the cactus”

Skep

s’kep

“from the gong”

Skitra

skil trau

“honest victory”

Sklar

skladantra ar’kadan

“message system specialist”

Skon

sohk-yon

“elegant fire”

Snil

s’nik’el

“from the convoy”

Sobek

s’obek

“from the honorable wait” (i.e., conceived during pon farr); variant of Sopek;

Sodok

s’otauk

“from the honorable cave”

Sofek

s’ofek

“from the honorable staff/scepter”

Sokel

sohk-yel

“elegant star”

Solek

s’oluhk(maat)

“from the snake clan”

Solen

s’oleh-nau

“from the honorable nineteen (a squad of martyred heroes)”

Solin

s’solai-igen

“from the sky-field”

Solkar

solai-kar

“field arm;” a field hand

Solok

shasol+ok

“rural, pagan”

Solor

solek-tor

“one who works the soil”

Sonak

s’on ahkhu

“from both wars”

Sopeg

s’obek

“from the honorable wait” (i.e., conceived during pon farr); variant of Sobek

Sopek

s’obek

“from the honorable wait” (i.e., conceived during pon farr); variant of Sobek

Soral

sa’Raal

“out of Raal”

Sorahl

sa’Raal

“out of Raal;” a variant of Soral

Soran

tsoraya+an

“cache”

Sorek

so-reshek

“insane”

Sorel

tsoraya yel

“star cache”

Sorn

s’orensu

“from the student”

Sorrd

sau rytemk

“one who radiates rytemk” (state of healing)

Sotir

s’otir

“from the dry lake bed”

Soton

ovsot yon

“complete fire”

Soval

s’oveh ashal

“from the honored beloved one”

Sovar

sov ar’kadan

“air worker”

Sovik

s’ovik

“from the honorable well”

Spahn

spoh ahnsu

“pale combatant”

Spelak

s’pi’halek

“from the little wheel”

Spet

s’petakov

“from the darling one”

Spock

spo’k’hat’n’dlawa

“resembling half of each other’s heart and soul”

Sreil

s’reldai

“from the priestess”

Stak

s’ta’Krat

“from the seventh month”

Stalat

s’t’lakht

“from the tenth month”

Stalek

s’taluhk

“from the precious one”

Stark

s’tah rok

“from unobtainable hope”

Stavel

s’tauf-el

“from the free ridge”

Stavin

s’tauf-hinek

“from the bone ridge”

Stef

s’tev’rak

“from the west”

Stel

s’tel

“from the bond”

Stelev

stegel arev

“stiff desert wind”

Stell

s’ti-yel

“from the star-spear”

Stepn

svep-dvinsu

“doorkeeper”

Stimm

s’temep

“from the gate”

Stonn

stonn

“antler”

Storn

storaun

“developing/advancing”

Streon

storik-yon

“advanced fire”

Strom

s’trufemu

“from the martyr”

Stron

stron

“escape”

Sudoc

s’udohk

“from the river-mist”

Suhur

su huhrik

“highest-ranking person”

Sulen

su’elan

“emancipation”

Sunak

suk’nak

“big cheek”

Sunok

su-nok

“concrete-person/worker

Sunvar

su nah-tor varu

“person who thinks tales”

Surak

s’ur’ahkh

“from the tunnel war”

Surev

s’uralaun arev

“from the singing desert wind”

Suter

su terseht

“insignia person”; a herald

Sutok

su-tauk

“cave-person”

Suvel

su-dvel

“choice-person; selector”

Suvin

su vinik

“mature person”

Suvok

su-vok

“level-person;” a mason’s apprentice

Suvuk

su-ulef-uk

“half-digit person”

Svaid

svai-tor

“to bloom”

Sybok

svai-bah-ker

“(master of the ) bloom garden”

Syrilius

si’rilokav’es

“outside of fallacy”

Syrran

s’yar-Arlanga

“from the grassy Arlanga Mountains

Syvar

svai-vafersu

“bloom regenerator; gardener”

NAMES starting with T’ prefix

T’Aimnu

t’sai aikum nu’ri

“lady of the young moon”

T’Alaro

t’sai ashal-Ah’rak

“lady of beloved Vulcan”

T’Aloren

t’sai ashal-orensu

“lady of the beloved student”

T’Amar

t’sai ahn’vahr

“lady of the double-edged sword”

T’Ara

t’sai arev vakh

“lady bold desert wind”

T’Aria

t’sai ha ri’a’gra

“lady resolute life”

T’Arvot

t’sai arev-odva

“lady of the desert-wind faith”

T’Dar

t’sai dahr

“secondary lady” (of the house)

T’Deata

t’da’a’tja

“of the dark pebble”

T’Dess

t’sai desh-rak

“lady of the north”

T’Enne

t’sai en’ahr’at

“lady godparent”

T’Evoryn

t’sai teh-vohr-runu

“lady of one hundred halting dreams”

T’Gai

t’sai gadzhai

“lady of the feast”

T’Gra

t’sai Gratan

“lady of Gratan” (a mythological desert spirit)

T’Hen

t’sai ha’e-igen

“lady sky-light,” i.e., a light in the sky (not a light in the ceiling)

T’Kar

t’sai kahr

“city lady”

T’Karik

t’sai karik

“strong lady”

T’Karra

t’sai kar-vakh

“lady bold-arm”

T’Kin

t’sai kin-kuhr

“golden lady”

T’Kiha

t’sai ki-haf

“basket lady”

T’Klaas

t’klashausu asal

“of the morning guard”

T’Klass

t’klashausu

“of the guard”

T’Kosa

t’sai khosaar

“lady of Khosaar” (an ancient god of war)

T’Laan

t’sai la’n’u

“lady who approves”

T’Lak

t’sai lakh

“lady of language”

T’Lan

t’sai lan

“lady of rank”

T’Lar

t’sai lara

“lady blue desert bird;” an shortened form of T’Lara

T’Lara

t’sai lara

“lady blue desert bird”

T’Larn

t’sai lara-ain

“lady of the dazzling blue garment”

T’Leia

t’sai leshu iyula

“lady bearer of culture”

T’Leiar

t’sai leshu yar

“lady bearer of grass/green”

T’Leng

t’sai leshu an’jmizn

“lady bearer of the captain”

T’Lera

t’sai lerashan

“lady consolidation”

T’Les

t’sai les

“target lady”

T’Lie

t’sai limein

“lady of the mask”

T’Lil

t’sai leh-hilek

“lady ten-shovels”

T’Liri

t’sai leshu ir-izh

“lady bearer of distant snow”

T’Lona

t’sai lo’uk-nahp

“lady of great thought”

T’Loran

t’sai  leshu orenan

“lady bearer of learning”

T’Lores

t’sai leshu fator’es

“lady bearer of continuity”

T’Lura

t’sai leshu uralaun

“lady bearer of singing”

T’Lyra

t’sai lirpa

“lady of the lirpa (a traditional Vulcan weapon)”

T’Madh

t’sai mathu

“lady of the scale”

T’Mal

t’sai malat

“nature lady”

T’Mar

t’sai mahr

“lady of the market

T’Maran

t’sai mahran

“lady of buying”

T’Meni

t’sai men-hilsu

“lady investigator”

T’Mihn

t’sai maat i’ni

“lady of the copper clan”

T’Mir

t’sai maat irak

“lady of the distant clan”

T’Mirek

t’sai maat ri-ek’traik

“lady of the ethereal clan”

T’Mor

t’sai mor

“leaf lady;” an herbalist or tea merchant

T’Nedara

t’sai Natara

“lady of Natara”

 (ancient god of water)

T’Neithan

t’sai nei-pseth-thon

“lady of the dry-seed-measure”

T’Neveith

t’sai nuf-ithag

“lady case expert”

T’Olryn

t’sai oleshu runu

“lady honored bearer of dreams”

T’Paal

t’sai pa’alem-masu

“lady around the saltwater”

T’Pak

t’pagun

“of the duel”

T’Pan

t’sai panah

“lady who considers”

T’Par

t’sai paribaya

“lady of discussion”

T’Para

t’sai pa’rau-nol

“lady around the refuge”

T’Parel

t’sai pa’reldai

“lady around the priestess;” an acolyte

T’Partha

t’sai pa’a’ri’a’Tha

“lady around the correct experience of the universe”

T’Pau

t’sai pau

“lady corona”

T’Pavis

t’sai pa’vis

“lady around the (fishing) net”

T’Pei

t’sai pi-feh

“lady of the little peak”

T’Peia

t’sai pa’eitaya

“lady around the shear”

T’Pel

t’sai pelal

“lady of the robe”

T’Pelek

t’sai pelal eik

“lady of the wide robe”

T’Penna

t’sai pi’en’ahr’at

“little lady godparent”

T’Peyra

t’sai pi’yai Reah

“lady little flame of Reah” (ancient goddess of death)

T’Pina

t’sai pi’nartaya

“lady little embrace”

T’Pir

t’sai pi’hirat

“little crimson lady”

T’Plana-Hath

t’sai pla-nahan-a’Tha

“lady return-thinking to the direct experience of the universe”

T’Pol

t’sai pollu

“lady of the pollu bush”

T’Pren

t’sai pi’run

“lady little dream”

T’Preth

t’sai per-ithop

“actress”

T’Pri

t’sai pi’ri’a’gra

“little resolute lady”

T’Pris

t’sai pris

“lady of the braid”

T’Pring

t’sai prai ngiq’e

“lady who assumes acquisition”

T’Prol

t’sai pi’rolaya

“lady little reaction”

T’Prylla

t’sai pi’ryll-ha

“lady little ryll-vigor”; ryll is another word for ka’athaira, a Vulcan lute

T’Ra

t’sai ho-rah

“lady of ritual”

T’Rama

t’sai rahm vakh

“lady bold thunder”

T’Ranneha

t’sai rahm nehayan

“lady decaying thunder”

T’Raya

t’sai raya

“lady refuge”

T’Rea

t’sai Reah

“lady of Reah” (ancient goddess of death and bereavement)

T’Rehu

t’sai rehu

“lady of the three”

T’Rel

t’sai reldai

“lady priestess”

T’Reni

t’sai reh-ni’rch

“lady three fires”

T’Resik

t’sai reh-eshikh

“lady of three deserts”

T’Risa

t’sai rishan-ha

“lady of vigorous survival”

T’Ruhi

t’sai run-ihn

“lady dense dream”

T’Rya

t’sai ri’a’gra

“resolute lady”

T’Saaf

t’sai s’afersu

“lady from the founder”

T’Saan

t’sai sa’yon

“lady from out of the fire”

T’Sai

t’sai

“lady”

T’Sala

t’sai salan

“lady wind”

T’Sanvi

t’sai sanuk vik

“lady pleasant well”

T’Saen

t’sai sa’wein

“lady from out of the cover;” i.e., from the pages of a book, from legend

T’Saien

t’sai sa’igen

“lady from out of the sky/heavens”

T’Sehn

t’sai se’heikan

“lady of the declaration”

T’Sel

t’sai selk

“delta lady”

T’Selis

t’sai zhel-izh

“lady of the snowline”

T’Sey

t’sai seo’a

“lady who asserts”

T’Shael

t’sai s’ha’gel

“lady from the light”

T’Shanik

t’sai shan’hal’lik

“lady loved at first sight”

T’Shenn

t’sai shen

“lady of ascent”

T’Shevat

t’sai she’rak vat

“lady of the eastern vault”

T’Sri

t’sai srikh

“lady of the srikh” (a unit of currency)

T’Syra

t’sai s’iraktra

“lady from the expanse”

T’Thelaih

t’sai thol-vai

“holy noble lady”

T’Vaakis

t’sai vakh’es

“lady of boldness”

T’Vei

t’sai vai

“holy lady”

T’Vel

t’sai vel

“simple/uncomplicated lady”

T’Velar

t’sai fel-ar’kadan

“lady rower”

T’Veran

t’sai firan

“lady support”

T’Vhet

t’sai vet

“lady of doubt”

T’Via

t’sai vi ha

“lady who is life”

T’Vin

t’sai vi ne’shau

“lady who greets”

T’Vish

t’sai vishizhukel

“foundry lady”

T’Vora

t’sai kuvoran

“winding lady”

T’Vran

t’sai-varan

“storytelling lady”

T’Vria

t’sai vre-ha

“life-vessel lady”

T’Vysse

t’sai visak’a

“lady legacy”

T’Zan

t’sai zan

“lady of the view”

T’Zora

t’sai zhagra

“lady of the game”

Vulcan Personal Names (Part 9)

VULCAN MYSTICISM

Previously, we saw how nature has been revered in Vulcan names. In addition to the totem animals of tribes, names such as Stonn (stonn = “antler”), Tuvok (tu va’khen = “way of the mountain raptor”), T’Lara (t’sai lara = “lady blue desert bird”), and S’laron (s’lara-yon = “from the blue firebird”) show a reverence for wildlife. Likewise, the wind was respected for its strength, the seeds it carried, and the relief it brought from the heat. The element arev (“desert wind”) appears in several names: Evoras (arev-vohris = “desert breeze”), Aravik (arev vik = “well of the desert wind”), T’Ara (t’sai arev vakh = “lady bold desert wind”), Evekh (arev ekhlami = “surrounded by desert wind”), and Surev (s’uralaun arev = “from the singing desert wind”). The element salan (“wind”) as in T’Sala (t’sai salan = “lady wind”) was also used in naming traditions but less often.

Thunder occurs infrequently on Vulcan, but when it struck in ancient times, it must have been a terrifying force – painful to sensitive ears – to comprehend. Names such as T’Rama (t’sai rahm vakh = “lady thunder”) and N’Evran (nei arev-rahm = “seed of the desert thunder-wind”) pay homage to this natural phenomenon. Some scholars believe that the word for “thunder,” rahm, might have originally referred to the rumble of an earthquake or volcano.

Phenomena of the celestial realm did not escape Vulcan notice or fascination. The name element yel (star) is still common today. Selon (s’yel-yon = “from the star-fire”), Selik (s’yel’iki = “from the soul of the star”), Sorel (tsoraya-yel = “star cache”)1, and Selek (s’yel-ekon = “from the star-god”) are some of the oldest recorded Vulcan names, as is T’Pau (t’sai pau = “lady corona”). Other names also reference light: T’Shael (t’sai s’ha’gel = “lady from the light”), T’Hen (also rendered T’Hain, from ha’ge-igen = “lady sky-light”)2, and the curious name S’harien (s’harr-igen = “from the tail of the sky,” an expression thought to refer to the phenomenon of a sun pillar).

Vulcan personal names also point to a pantheon of prehistoric gods. Like many cultures on Earth, it was considered sacrilegious to take the name of a god or goddess. One was, after all, a servant of the divine. Examples of these names include T’Nedara (t’sai Natara = “lady of Natara,” god of water), T’Kosa (t’sai Khosaar = “lady of Khosaar,” a god of war), T’Gra (t’sai Gratan = “lady of Gratan,” a desert spirit), Serevan (s’Reah-van-kal = “from Reah’s ceremony,” a goddess of death and loss), and Refas (Reah-vash = “Reah’s terror” – a favorite among the te-Vikram brotherhood).

From the temple traditions come the names T’Sanik (t’sai sa’nikh = “lady from out of the Eye”)3 and T’Vria (t’sai vre-ha = “lady life-vessel”). But no name is more mystical than T’Plana-Hath (t’sai pla-nahan-a’Tha = “lady return-thinking to the direct experience of the Universe”). The only bearer of that name was the head of a school of Vulcan historians during the Sudocian Wars. Her History of Logic remains a standard text in Vulcan universities. Surak was one of her pupils.4

Next week, I’ll wrap up our study of Vulcan names with a list of the most common personal names and their meanings.

1 An early expression for “galaxy.”

2 i.e., a light in the sky, not an overhead window.

3 A reference to T’Khut, Vulcan’s sister planet.

4 The way of kolinahr: the Vulcans. (1998). Culver City, CA: Last Unicorn Games, p. 15.

Vulcan Personal Names (Part 8)

TROUBLED TIMES

Along with occupation, ancestry, and personal qualities, Vulcan names point sharply to a history of violence, food and water shortages, and social upheaval. Some of the oldest names come to us from the Ancient Vulcan language and express a basic struggle for survival. For example, Satak (sa’i’hatik = “from out of the surviving”), T’Risa (t’sai rishan-ha = “lady of vigorous survival”), and T’Aria (t’sai ha ri’a’gra = “lady of resolute life”) come to mind. On a planet where solar flares made farming impossible in some regions and unpredictable in others, hunger was an ever-present reality. Starvation ensued when supply lines were cut and trade embargos enforced. Two names celebrate the survival of hungry times: Tavin (t’avon = “of the hunger”) and Kerak (k’yerak = “with bowl,” i.e. “with food”). This last name may simply be an expression of hope that the next generation would not go hungry.

Hope was a luxury to most Vulcans but one they did not hesitate to share with their children and community. Names like Dzharok (also spelled Jarok in Federation Standard English; dzhar-rok = “lay/song of hope”) and Turak (tu-rok = “way of hope”) were popular in war-torn regions along the eastern shore of the Voroth Sea during the Second Dynasty. Specific wars and skirmishes were commemorated in personal names, such as Saavik (sa’ahkh-vik = “from out of the well-war”) and Surak (s’ur-ahkh = “from the tunnel-war”). One of the stories surrounding Surak’s birth is that on the night his mother went into labor, she was forced to make her way to the medical center through the tunnels beneath Shi’Kahr’s Old Town, but she almost didn’t make it. While the warlord Sudoc bombarded the city with missile strikes, suicide bombers forced their way into the tunnels. The majority of the Raalan missiles were shot down, but it took Shialan ground forces nine days to secure the tunnels and lava tubes beneath the city.

Another conflict from Surak’s time, noted in the Vulcan personal name Sasek, was the Sundering, when those who would become the Rihannsu left in generational ships to find a new home on Romulus. Sasek is formed from sa’Seheikk’ke, meaning literally “away from the Sundered,” an indication that the one who bore the name, or the parent who bestowed it, did not agree or associate with those who called themselves the Sundered.

As warlords vied for territory and natural resources, the victorious more often than not oppressed their conquered populations. Resistance cells developed, as is evidenced in names like Selden (s’el-tehnaya = “from the free resistance”) and Velekh (veh el’es ekhlami = “one surrounded by freedom”). The warrior was honored and boasted in many names, such as Senek (senepa-ekon = “knife-god”), Senkar (senepa kahr = “knife of the city”), T’Lyra (t’sai lirpa = “lady of the lirpa”), T’Amar (t’sai ahn’vahr = “lady of the double-edge sword”), Mahak (mah-vel + ak = “hammer-like), T’Vran (t’sai vi ran = “lady who kills”), and equally chilling monikers like Dvir (duv-hirat = “crimson shadow”). It’s no wonder that the name T’Vhet (t’sai vet = “lady of doubt”) became popular in Surak’s time.

Within the shadows of dark times, Vulcan mysticism flourished, offering a beacon of light for the hungry and oppressed. For my last installment on Vulcan personal names, I’ll point out those names which developed from Vulcan mystic and religious traditions.