The Silences

Ralash WhiteDuring the time he spent speaking in Shi’Kahr’s public places, advocating for a change in Vulcan lifestyle, Surak often spoke of respect. It was the one simple courtesy he felt was essential for each Vulcan to master and practice on a daily basis. Without it there could be no emotional control and no peace. Respect was sorely lacking in Vulcan culture during his time, as he demonstrated in this speech given on the steps of the Suta Temple in the year 323. In it, he outlined a code of conduct which became known as The Silences.

“It is always a signal that something is wrong when leaders live by different rules than citizens. In fact, it is the breakdown of society, of all that is civilized. A citizen cannot access the networks without being tracked. Purchases, conversations, messages, information-searches, images, health records, employment records, academic records, criminal records, family records, and property records are captured by data-mining software. The information is sold to the one who makes the highest offer. Credit applications are denied due to political affiliation. Job applicants are turned away because of their genetic predisposition to diseases. Identities, access codes, and bank accounts are stolen. Political opponents contact voters directly and take positions or make promises that are shielded from scrutiny by the public. Students are expelled for criticizing their teachers. Surveillance cameras are installed along borders encouraging anyone to access and monitor illegal crossings. False reports and vigilantism come in waves.

“Yet one cannot learn by accessing the nets what Minister Pola purchased today, what he ate for breakfast, what vaccinations he’s received or what childhood diseases he’s had, what genetic diseases are prevalent in his family, his score on the Academy exit exam, what transportation he uses, what personal interests he has, what his marital status is, when his last pon farr was and if any offspring were produced, what his household income is, or even where his private residence is located. All one sees is a simple file which includes his educational degrees and specialty, his title of office, and his official commcode. No personal information is given.

“This is how it should be – for all of us. Only in the sanctity of privacy can we find peace. The intensity and complexity of life meant to evolve civilization have done the opposite – devolved it – making retreat from the world a necessity for Vulcan sanity and the control of the emotions. Modern technology and business practices, through invasion of privacy and lack of societal regulation, have subjected us to mental distress far greater than any bodily injury. We have lost our right as individuals to be let alone. Once information and images of an individual are on the nets, they can be used against that individual in perpetuity, making it impossible for him or her to leave an old life behind and start a new one. We have lost our integrity and far more. We have lost our soul because we have lost respect for one another.

“Only by leaving others the privacy of their minds and lives can we regain what we have lost. The courts do not protect individuals against the collection and selling of personal information. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the citizen to uphold the right of those around him to be let alone.

“How can we do this? Through the elimination of the incessant noise of life – through The Silences – by allowing each individual privacy in these aspects of life:

Birth:  This is a private journey shared by mother and child. No others should be present except those responsible for their care. The mother should not be distracted from bonding with the child. Announcing the birth on the nets and posting images leaves the child vulnerable.

Home and family life:  The location of one’s home must remain private information to preserve the sanctity of the house as a retreat from the world. While the honor and tradition of guest-right should be maintained, do not expect to be invited to the home of another. When wishing to meet with one whom you do not know, request that the meeting occur in a public place so that you do not intrude upon the individual’s personal sanctuary. Additionally, the individual should be contacted through his or her place of work or study and not at home.

Personal space:  Allow each individual a cushion of space. Do not intrude with your gaze, your voice, or your touch. Remain at a respectful distance, at least one pace away. Establish consent, even with the one to whom you are bonded, before you invade the other’s space. Do not ask another’s name of a third party. Wait for the owner to give it.

Spiritual beliefs:  Allow one the privacy of his or her experience with the being or force responsible for the creation and maintenance of the universe. It is a journey you cannot take and it is not your concern. We each have our own journey to which we must attend.

Thoughts and remembrances:  I have said before that it is the inherent right of all Vulcans to meld in mind and spirit. If you meld, do not invade the thoughts and remembrances of the other. Let the other reveal them to you, if that is his or her wish. Likewise, do not force your thoughts, desires, or memories on the other. Wait for an invitation. And above all else, never enter the other’s mind unbidden.

Time alone:  When you sense that you have come to the limits of your abilities, retreat into your personal sanctuary and conserve energy. Likewise, allow each individual time alone to heal and renew the mind, body, and soul.

Bonding and pon farr:  There are few situations in life that are more sacred than the link between bondmates. When their link is active through a mind-meld, pon farr, the birth of a child, or a more mundane event, no one else in the world matters, and no one should intrude. Even the status of their bonding is a matter only to be shared between the pair, their families, and close friends. And when their bond is severed by death, the survivor should be cared for but left to heal in the privacy of his or her thoughts and memories.

Death:  There is no life event more personal than death. While birth is the experience of two, death can only be experienced by one. It is a solitary journey. Allow those dying privacy. It is the last offer of respect that we can give. Death records, like all medical records, should be sealed, made available only to those who demonstrate a legal or scientific need to know.”

These are The Silences – the quieting of the noise of the Vulcan species.

_____________________

For those of you who would like to practice reading in Traditional Golic Vulcan, here is the original text:   Ralash-Fam’eslar

Archaeological Find Linked to Surak

The Vulcan Science Academy has gained access to a section of tunnel deep beneath the city of Surak's Mug 1Shi’Kahr during an excavation sponsored by the T’Planna-Hath Historical Society. When the Society announced that it expected to link the tunnel to Surak, the excavation was funded in part by House Sekir, the dynastic family to which Surak belonged. While it has long been thought that the 2,567.83 kilometers of tunnels beneath Shi’al’s capital city had all been mapped, a previously unknown section, 15.91 km in length, was revealed to structural engineers after the T’keKhuti Quake. For millennia, the tunnels served as drainage conduits in rare but devastating floods, as well as escape routs and sally ports in times of war. They were places of refuge for the homeless, petty thieves, and smugglers. During Surak’s time, the tunnels had a dark and lawless life of their own. The Shi’Kahran government was too preoccupied with repelling the Sudocian invasion to patrol the seedy underground. In fact, officials had a mutual understanding with the gangs that prowled the tunnels, who efficiently defended these networks of caverns against foreign commando strikes and infiltration.

Although Surak never wrote about his experience in the tunnels, a few who encountered him there did. On more than one occasion, he used the tunnels to escape angry mobs in the city streets when impromptu gatherings and lectures drew violent opposition. As his popularity grew, civilian authorities considered his public teachings such a nuisance that they sought to arrest him for inciting riots, but they always lost his trail in the sprawling labyrinth of tunnels. There Surak and his followers found an enclave of supporters who could quickly smuggle them to a safe haven and cover their tracks.

Years later, upon his death, 5,786,411 people signed the online remembrance book, jamming the nets for 3.71 days. In that guestbook, preserved in the Academy archives, is an entry by T’Vei who wrote, “I shall never forget the day Surak suddenly appeared among us. I had previously seen him from afar and was familiar with his image posted on the nets, but he was much smaller than I’d imagined, and at first I didn’t believe it was him. He was very thin, for he was constantly on the move in those days. He had come through the tunnel leading to the storage chamber beneath my studio. My family mostly used it as a shelter from air strikes during the war.

“The day Surak came, I was preparing glazes for a series of firepots commissioned by the Suta Temple. He inclined his head and said, ‘I ask forgiveness. My days are not mine and I have no wish to disturb yours.’ He was not hurt, but one of his two companions had a cut over one eye. They had escaped a disagreeable crowd that corned them in the market. ‘We lost the fruit and bread we had purchased,’ the one with the cut said, ‘but not our honor.’

“I gave them fire and water in the custom of old and we shared a meal of mashya and fire-fruit. When they left in the middle of the night, I gave Surak a cup I had designed for the temple priests. Again, he inclined his head, and accepting the cup, he said, ‘What we begin here will alter the face of our world. Live long and prosper, t’hy’la.’”

T’Vei went on to write, “Surak and his companions carried very little with them, obtaining what they needed in exchange for their teachings. But Surak tied the cup to his belt with a scrap of cloth and it went everywhere with him. Every time I caught a glimpse of him on the nets, it was either cradled in his hands or tied to his belt. I was told later that he would drink from no other vessel – to minimize the risk of being poisoned.”

Surak's Mug 2T’Vei became one of Vulcan’s most famous potters, and much of her work can now be seen in the T’Sar Museum. The Suta Temple kept careful records of the work commissioned from her, and because of these records, the fragments of the cup found in the recent excavation have been identified as originated from her studio. DNA analysis of the residual protein molecules adhering to the glaze has revealed that the cup had been used by Surak and handled to a lesser degree by T’Vei. In a journal entry made accessible by T’Vei’s estate, she noted that the cup was returned to her following the death of Surak and kept as a prized possession on a shelf in her studio. The cup was presumed lost when the studio was destroyed in an earthquake. Although she had the means to hire a salvage crew, she allowed the city to fill in the area and retired from her craft. “Surak always said, ‘Kaiidth – what is, is,’ she wrote, ending her journal entry.

Surak’s cup, along with several other artifacts currently under study at the VSA, will arrive later this year as part of a special exhibit at the T’Sar Museum entitled: Surak: The Tunnel Years.

A List of Vulcan Names

As promised, we’re finishing up our discussion of Vulcan personal names with a list of the most common and notable names throughout history, along with their etymology and meaning. The list is broken up, alphabetically,  into three sections: A-R, T-Z, with separate lists for names starting with S and names containing the T’ prefix — as is common for Vulcan directories.

This list is by no means comprehensive and will be updated as time allows. If you’re interested in the etymology or meaning of a name that does not appear on this list, or if you’d like to know the source for a particular name, please feel free to email me. Some meanings are rather obscure, especially to offworlders, and I may be able to shed some additional light on certain traditions. I welcome your inquiries: sidzhan.tgai@gmail.com

NAMES A- R, T-Z

FEDERATION STANDARD

GOLIC VULCAN

DERIVED MEANING

Adenkar

adun karik

“strong husband”

Alieth

al’rig-pseth

“desert-branch”

Aloran

ashal-orensu

“beloved student”

Anauk

ha nauk

“cries vigorously”

Aravik

arev vik

“desert-wind well”

Arev

arev

“desert wind”

Asil

asal

“morning”

Avarak

aber-rok

“one who raises hope”

Avarin

aber+in

“one who lifts/raises”

Awidat

vakh wi datorik

“bold yet prepared”

Ayhan

vai yon

“holy fire”

Azeraik

az’ir-vaikar

“devoted mate”

Balev

ba-lahv

“traditional tongue”

Chu’lak

khau-lakh

“one who has command of language”

Delvok

dvelan vokaya

“will of memory”

Denak

dvinsu ekon-ak

“servant of the divine eye”

Dvir

duv-hirat

“crimson shadow”

Dzharok

dzhar-rok

“lay/song of hope”

Dzhossen

dvinsu zul-os-yon

“servant of the old lava fire”

Elieth

elik pseth

“free desert”

Elonat

el-on-natya

“both different and free”

Evekh

arev ekhlami

“surrounded by desert wind”

Evoras

arev vohris

“desert breeze”

Falor

fal+tor

“one who makes hot; bellows-worker”

Fer’at

feretausu

“gatherer”

Galsh

gal-en-shi

(from the) “moss place”

Grake

grei-faitik

“esoteric”

Grelek

kril’es-ek

“total harmony”

Haadok

ha-dahkuh

“two-life; twin”

Hanesh

feihan eshikh

“boss of the desert”

Harauk

ha taurauk

“amazing life”

Iria

hirat vre-ha

“crimson life-vessel”

Ivek

heya-vik

“mountain well”

Karatek

nakaratik

“endeavoring”

Kawarda

kahwa’ra-de

“similar mind;” name given to a twin

Kerak

k’yerak

“with bowl” (i.e., one who won’t go hungry)

Kesh

rik’esh

“without breath”

Kiri-kin-tha

kiri-kin than-tha

“golden one from Kir who guides children through their first meld”

Koss

rik’koshvar

“without disaster”

Kov

kov

“stone”

Kovar

kov ar’kadan

“stone worker”

Kuvak

ku vakh

“bold palm”

L’Nel

leshu nel-dath

“bearer of the pattern”

L’Vor

leshu va’orenan

“bearer of infinite learning”

Ladok

la dvin-tor oekon

“here serves the honorable god”

Lerius

leshu e’rroi’es

“bearer of attraction”

Lhai

leshu hai-fan

“banner carrier”

Lodzhal

leshu ozhika ashal

“bearer of beloved logic”

Lorian

leshu ro’fori+an

“bearer of information”

Lorot

leshu ro’fori ovsot

“bearer of complete information”

Lovar

lofik ar’kadan

“purposeful worker”

Lyras

lesh zherka hasu

“being who carries emotion”

M’Fau

maat fau

“clan who rides; The Riders”

Mahak

mahvel+ak

“hammer-like”

Menos

menal os

“(from the ) old cliff”

Mestral

mes-tor ye-halek

“one who crosses the galaxy”

Metana

maat-ta’an

“gift of the clan”

Mishih

mishitra hiyasu

“equipment expert”

Mitrani

m’aih toranik

“busy mother”

Muroc

mu-yor rok

“night hope”

N’Ereon

nei fer-yon

“seed of the fire-generation”

N’Evran

nei arev-rahm

“seed of the desert thunder-wind”

N’Keth

nei k’pseth

“desert seed”

N’Livek

nei li-wun-veh

“seed of the one with the lance”

N’Maret

nei mahr-ret

“seed of the market”

N’Oblan

nei opla-ang’dzhmizm

“seed of the honorable rear captain”

N’Rayek

nei Reah-yai-ek

“seed of Reah’s flame”

N’Vea

nei vi ha

“seed which is life”

N’Veyan

nei veh-yon

“seed of the flaming one”

Nesheh

veh neseshau

“one who deduces”

Nirak

nirak

“fool”

Nivol

nikh-vul

“eye-slant”

Nomikh

nei omekh

“seed of honorable parent”

Nu’Val

nei uzh-vahlsu

“seed of the new bestower”

Oratt

oradasu

“honorable spinner”

Paradaik

pa ra dakh

“the one around what is cast out”

Pekev

puhku gef

“(from the) amber coast”

Perren

perren

“actor”

Pola

po’lahv

“one who has the last word”

Prisu

prisu

“braider”

Radak

ra dak

“what is cast out”; an outcast

Radzhek

razhek

“awl”

Raelyek

Raal-yai-ek

“Raalan flame”

Ravanok

rarav-kanok

“every song”

Refas

Reah-vash

“Reah-terror”

Rekan

rehr-kan

“third child”

Romar

rom-ar’kadan

“good worker”

Rovalat

rok vahl lakht

“a grant of hope in the 10th month”

Tallera

talu lerash

“hard neck”

Talok

taluhk

“precious”

Tasav

tah-savas

“unobtainable fruit”

Taurik

taurau+ik

“amazing”

Tavek

tah va’khen

“unobtainable mountain raptor”

Tavin

t’avon

“of the hunger/famine”

Tekav

teker-khaf

“deviant blood”

Teknat

tehk-natya

“different sprout”

Telas

tel-hasu

“telepathic being”

Tellus

tel’es

“embodiment of the telepathic bond”

Tes

tesmur

“to prosper”

Teska

tehs-kau-bosh

“deceit-wise”

Tevik

dif-vik

“long-life well”

Tok

tok

“fine”

Tolaris

t’olara’es

“of the honorable blue” (house color)

Tolek

t’oluhk (maat)

“of the snake (clan)”

Torin

tor+in

“doer/ maker”

Tos

to-sai

“cloak/cloaked one”

Tu’Pari

tu pa’ritsuri

“the way around the unusual”

Turak

tu-rok

“way of hope”

Tuvok

tu va’khen

“way of the mountain raptor”

V’Lar

veh leshu a’riv’ne

“one who is bearer of a’riv’ne”

V’Las

veh leshu asenara

“one who is bearer of the lantern”

Vach

vakh

“bold”

Valeris

va’lerash’es

“immeasurable hardness”

Vanik

vaunik

“hesitant”

Varek

var+ek

“talkative”

Varekat

varu eik katausu

“broad storyteller”

Varen

aber+in; a variant of Avarin

“one who raises up”

Varith

var ithag

“story challenger/expert”

Vedzhat

veh-zad

“forbidden one”

Vektan

duvek ta’an

“shade gift”

Velekh

veh el’es ekhlami

“one surrounded by freedom”

Velik

velik

“simple/uncomplicated”

Verrin

ver-tor+in

“one who edits/editor”

Vethek

veh thek

“one who drops;” an indication of epilepsy

Vorant

vai oren-tor

“to learn (is) holy”

Vorealt

vohris ryll-torsu

“slow ryll-player;” a ryll is a ka’athaira, a Vulcan lute

Vorik

veh orfik-kel

“one of the ancestors; a throw-back”

Voris

vohris

“slow/methodical”

Vyorin

vi orenau

“one who studies”

Ych’a

yel tsatik

“secret star”

Yehenik

yai-enek

“fire-pain”

Yiluv

yel-ulef

“half-star”

Yuris

ur-is

“one who uses tunnels”

Zebed

za’bezhun

“behind-eye;” one who can see into the past or has “eyes” on the back of his head

Zerin

zeh-hir run

“onyx dream”

Zhi’rev

zhai arev

“grey wind”

NAMES starting with S

At the time of the Sundering, 28.6% of Vulcan’s population had taken S names to honor Surak.

S’harien

s’harr-igen

“from the tail of the sky (sun-tower)”

S’chn

s’khart-lan

“from the captain”

S’laron

s’lara-yon

“from the fire-bird”

S’lovan

s’lo’uk van-kal

“from the great ceremony”

S’rivas

s’ri’vas

“from no relief”

S’t’kal

s’t’sai kal’i

“from the lady of the challenge”

S’task

s’tcha-ihsek

“from the curling fog”

S’tvan

s’tviyan

“from the core”

S’vec

s’vik

“from the well”

S’wek

s’awek

“from out of solitude”

Saavik

sa’ahkh-vik

“from the well-war”

Sadzhik

sa’dzhasifik

“from out of jasif crystal”

Sakht

sakkhet

“longevity”

Sakkath

sakkhet-dath

“tendency towards longevity”

Sakonna

sakunotau

“one who extrapolates”

Sakorn

sakan oren

“spreading learning”

Salet

salatik

“indigenous/native”

Salkath

salan-k’rhth’a

“k’rhth’a- wind”; k’rhth’a is an herb

Salok

s’aluk (maat)

“from the fish (clan)”

Salvir

s’al vi ir

“from a distant male relative”

Sanshiin

sa(su)-na’shi’igen

“man at sky-place”

Sarda

sa-reldai

“priest”

Sarek

sahr ek’ariben’es

“fast fluency”

Sarissa

s’a’rs’a

“from the dance;” a dancer

Saros

s’arev-os

“from the old desert wind”

Sarpk

sahr pakashogaya

“fast perception”

Sasak

sa’sakkhet

“from out of longevity”

Sasek

sa’Seheikk’he

“away from the Sundred”

Sasav

sa’savas-shi

“from out of the fruit-place”

Satak

sa’i’hatik

“from out of the surviving”

Satat

sa’Tat’Sahr

“from out of Tat’Sahr”

Satelk

sa’telik

“from out of the bonded”

Satok

sa-tok

“fine male”

Savar

savarun

“digression”

Savel

sahriv-yel

“storm-star”

Savesh

sa’veshtaya

“outside of experience”

Saya

saya

“radiation/brilliance”

Scorus

ruskaraun’es

“embodiment of grasping”

Sefor

sef+tor

“dune-maker/shaper”

Segon

s’eik yon

“from the wide fire”

Sehlk

selk

“delta”

Sek

sek

“outlet/stream”

Sekir

s’sek-hirat

“from the crimson outlet/stream;”

Sekla

sek lamekh

“warm outlet/stream”

Selar

s’el-arev

“from the free desert wind”

Selden

s’el-tehnaya

“from the free resistance”

Selek

s’yel-ekon

“from the star-god”

Selik

s’yel i’ki

“from the soul of the star”

Selok

s’el-oekon

“from the free honorable god”

Selon

s’yel-yon

“from the star-fire”

Seltar

s’selk tor

“from the long delta”

Selv

s’el-veh

“from the free one”

Senak

senepa-ak

“knife-eye;” one who has a sharp eye

Sendet

senepa dator

“prepares senepa;” a knife-maker

Senek

senepa ekon

“knife god”

Senet

senepa-yeht

“knife-true”

Senkar

senepa kahr

“knife of the city”

Senor

seo’an+tor

“one who asserts”

Senva

senepa-vakh

“knife-bold”

Separ

senepa ar’kadan

“knife worker”

Sepek

sef-pelq

“dune captain”

Sepel

sep-wafikh el(ik)

“one who freely agrees

Sered

s’ir-ith’du

“from the distant camp”

Serevan

s’Reah van-kal

“from Reah’s ceremony”

Sern

asenara

“lantern”

Seroni

s’rom-nikh

“from the one with the good eye”

Sesenek

ses’ik ne ki’ne

“accountable sword-brother”

Setek

s’set-eik

“from the wide drop”

Sethan

s’pseth a’nirih

“from the desert father”

Sevennin

s’fen-igen

“from the sky-seal;” the Sky Clan used an emblem of the sky as their official seal.

Sev

seveh

“prosperity”

Sevek

seveh-ek

“total prosperity”

Sevel

seveh yel

“star of prosperity”

Seyhan

sihaunsu

“betting person”

Shanak

shan’hal’lak

“love at first-sight”

Shath

shen a’Tha

“ascent from the direct experience of the universe”

Shinat

s’shi Natara

“from the place of Natara” (god of water)

Shupal

shu-pal

“source”

Sidak

si’dahkuh

“from out of two”

Sidzhan

s’i’tsan

“from the bridge;” a reference to Seleya

Sihek

s’ihsek

“from the fog”

Sikan

s’ikun

“from the cone (volcano)”

Silek

si’lehk

“outside of ten;” a reference to the ten wells of the Shi’Kahr oasis

Silok

s’igen lo’uk

“from the great sky”

Simar

si’mahr

“outside the market”

Simora

si’mor-vakh

“outside bold leaf” (may refer to a place)

Sinak

s’igen-ak

“from the sky-eye” (a reference to T’Khut)

Sirak

s’irak-shi

“from the distant place”

Sirok

si’rok

“outside  hope”

Sitak

s’i’hatik

“from the surviving”

Sitar

s’itar-bosh

“from the thankful”

Sitok

s’igan tauk

“from the sky-cave”

Sivath

si’vath

“outside other;” outsider

Skamandros

skamau mamut-rushan

“one who attracts conversion-aid”

Skaren

s’ka-ran-zhi

“from the cactus”

Skep

s’kep

“from the gong”

Skitra

skil trau

“honest victory”

Sklar

skladantra ar’kadan

“message system specialist”

Skon

sohk-yon

“elegant fire”

Snil

s’nik’el

“from the convoy”

Sobek

s’obek

“from the honorable wait” (i.e., conceived during pon farr); variant of Sopek;

Sodok

s’otauk

“from the honorable cave”

Sofek

s’ofek

“from the honorable staff/scepter”

Sokel

sohk-yel

“elegant star”

Solek

s’oluhk(maat)

“from the snake clan”

Solen

s’oleh-nau

“from the honorable nineteen (a squad of martyred heroes)”

Solin

s’solai-igen

“from the sky-field”

Solkar

solai-kar

“field arm;” a field hand

Solok

shasol+ok

“rural, pagan”

Solor

solek-tor

“one who works the soil”

Sonak

s’on ahkhu

“from both wars”

Sopeg

s’obek

“from the honorable wait” (i.e., conceived during pon farr); variant of Sobek

Sopek

s’obek

“from the honorable wait” (i.e., conceived during pon farr); variant of Sobek

Soral

sa’Raal

“out of Raal”

Sorahl

sa’Raal

“out of Raal;” a variant of Soral

Soran

tsoraya+an

“cache”

Sorek

so-reshek

“insane”

Sorel

tsoraya yel

“star cache”

Sorn

s’orensu

“from the student”

Sorrd

sau rytemk

“one who radiates rytemk” (state of healing)

Sotir

s’otir

“from the dry lake bed”

Soton

ovsot yon

“complete fire”

Soval

s’oveh ashal

“from the honored beloved one”

Sovar

sov ar’kadan

“air worker”

Sovik

s’ovik

“from the honorable well”

Spahn

spoh ahnsu

“pale combatant”

Spelak

s’pi’halek

“from the little wheel”

Spet

s’petakov

“from the darling one”

Spock

spo’k’hat’n’dlawa

“resembling half of each other’s heart and soul”

Sreil

s’reldai

“from the priestess”

Stak

s’ta’Krat

“from the seventh month”

Stalat

s’t’lakht

“from the tenth month”

Stalek

s’taluhk

“from the precious one”

Stark

s’tah rok

“from unobtainable hope”

Stavel

s’tauf-el

“from the free ridge”

Stavin

s’tauf-hinek

“from the bone ridge”

Stef

s’tev’rak

“from the west”

Stel

s’tel

“from the bond”

Stelev

stegel arev

“stiff desert wind”

Stell

s’ti-yel

“from the star-spear”

Stepn

svep-dvinsu

“doorkeeper”

Stimm

s’temep

“from the gate”

Stonn

stonn

“antler”

Storn

storaun

“developing/advancing”

Streon

storik-yon

“advanced fire”

Strom

s’trufemu

“from the martyr”

Stron

stron

“escape”

Sudoc

s’udohk

“from the river-mist”

Suhur

su huhrik

“highest-ranking person”

Sulen

su’elan

“emancipation”

Sunak

suk’nak

“big cheek”

Sunok

su-nok

“concrete-person/worker

Sunvar

su nah-tor varu

“person who thinks tales”

Surak

s’ur’ahkh

“from the tunnel war”

Surev

s’uralaun arev

“from the singing desert wind”

Suter

su terseht

“insignia person”; a herald

Sutok

su-tauk

“cave-person”

Suvel

su-dvel

“choice-person; selector”

Suvin

su vinik

“mature person”

Suvok

su-vok

“level-person;” a mason’s apprentice

Suvuk

su-ulef-uk

“half-digit person”

Svaid

svai-tor

“to bloom”

Sybok

svai-bah-ker

“(master of the ) bloom garden”

Syrilius

si’rilokav’es

“outside of fallacy”

Syrran

s’yar-Arlanga

“from the grassy Arlanga Mountains

Syvar

svai-vafersu

“bloom regenerator; gardener”

NAMES starting with T’ prefix

T’Aimnu

t’sai aikum nu’ri

“lady of the young moon”

T’Alaro

t’sai ashal-Ah’rak

“lady of beloved Vulcan”

T’Aloren

t’sai ashal-orensu

“lady of the beloved student”

T’Amar

t’sai ahn’vahr

“lady of the double-edged sword”

T’Ara

t’sai arev vakh

“lady bold desert wind”

T’Aria

t’sai ha ri’a’gra

“lady resolute life”

T’Arvot

t’sai arev-odva

“lady of the desert-wind faith”

T’Dar

t’sai dahr

“secondary lady” (of the house)

T’Deata

t’da’a’tja

“of the dark pebble”

T’Dess

t’sai desh-rak

“lady of the north”

T’Enne

t’sai en’ahr’at

“lady godparent”

T’Evoryn

t’sai teh-vohr-runu

“lady of one hundred halting dreams”

T’Gai

t’sai gadzhai

“lady of the feast”

T’Gra

t’sai Gratan

“lady of Gratan” (a mythological desert spirit)

T’Hen

t’sai ha’e-igen

“lady sky-light,” i.e., a light in the sky (not a light in the ceiling)

T’Kar

t’sai kahr

“city lady”

T’Karik

t’sai karik

“strong lady”

T’Karra

t’sai kar-vakh

“lady bold-arm”

T’Kin

t’sai kin-kuhr

“golden lady”

T’Kiha

t’sai ki-haf

“basket lady”

T’Klaas

t’klashausu asal

“of the morning guard”

T’Klass

t’klashausu

“of the guard”

T’Kosa

t’sai khosaar

“lady of Khosaar” (an ancient god of war)

T’Laan

t’sai la’n’u

“lady who approves”

T’Lak

t’sai lakh

“lady of language”

T’Lan

t’sai lan

“lady of rank”

T’Lar

t’sai lara

“lady blue desert bird;” an shortened form of T’Lara

T’Lara

t’sai lara

“lady blue desert bird”

T’Larn

t’sai lara-ain

“lady of the dazzling blue garment”

T’Leia

t’sai leshu iyula

“lady bearer of culture”

T’Leiar

t’sai leshu yar

“lady bearer of grass/green”

T’Leng

t’sai leshu an’jmizn

“lady bearer of the captain”

T’Lera

t’sai lerashan

“lady consolidation”

T’Les

t’sai les

“target lady”

T’Lie

t’sai limein

“lady of the mask”

T’Lil

t’sai leh-hilek

“lady ten-shovels”

T’Liri

t’sai leshu ir-izh

“lady bearer of distant snow”

T’Lona

t’sai lo’uk-nahp

“lady of great thought”

T’Loran

t’sai  leshu orenan

“lady bearer of learning”

T’Lores

t’sai leshu fator’es

“lady bearer of continuity”

T’Lura

t’sai leshu uralaun

“lady bearer of singing”

T’Lyra

t’sai lirpa

“lady of the lirpa (a traditional Vulcan weapon)”

T’Madh

t’sai mathu

“lady of the scale”

T’Mal

t’sai malat

“nature lady”

T’Mar

t’sai mahr

“lady of the market

T’Maran

t’sai mahran

“lady of buying”

T’Meni

t’sai men-hilsu

“lady investigator”

T’Mihn

t’sai maat i’ni

“lady of the copper clan”

T’Mir

t’sai maat irak

“lady of the distant clan”

T’Mirek

t’sai maat ri-ek’traik

“lady of the ethereal clan”

T’Mor

t’sai mor

“leaf lady;” an herbalist or tea merchant

T’Nedara

t’sai Natara

“lady of Natara”

 (ancient god of water)

T’Neithan

t’sai nei-pseth-thon

“lady of the dry-seed-measure”

T’Neveith

t’sai nuf-ithag

“lady case expert”

T’Olryn

t’sai oleshu runu

“lady honored bearer of dreams”

T’Paal

t’sai pa’alem-masu

“lady around the saltwater”

T’Pak

t’pagun

“of the duel”

T’Pan

t’sai panah

“lady who considers”

T’Par

t’sai paribaya

“lady of discussion”

T’Para

t’sai pa’rau-nol

“lady around the refuge”

T’Parel

t’sai pa’reldai

“lady around the priestess;” an acolyte

T’Partha

t’sai pa’a’ri’a’Tha

“lady around the correct experience of the universe”

T’Pau

t’sai pau

“lady corona”

T’Pavis

t’sai pa’vis

“lady around the (fishing) net”

T’Pei

t’sai pi-feh

“lady of the little peak”

T’Peia

t’sai pa’eitaya

“lady around the shear”

T’Pel

t’sai pelal

“lady of the robe”

T’Pelek

t’sai pelal eik

“lady of the wide robe”

T’Penna

t’sai pi’en’ahr’at

“little lady godparent”

T’Peyra

t’sai pi’yai Reah

“lady little flame of Reah” (ancient goddess of death)

T’Pina

t’sai pi’nartaya

“lady little embrace”

T’Pir

t’sai pi’hirat

“little crimson lady”

T’Plana-Hath

t’sai pla-nahan-a’Tha

“lady return-thinking to the direct experience of the universe”

T’Pol

t’sai pollu

“lady of the pollu bush”

T’Pren

t’sai pi’run

“lady little dream”

T’Preth

t’sai per-ithop

“actress”

T’Pri

t’sai pi’ri’a’gra

“little resolute lady”

T’Pris

t’sai pris

“lady of the braid”

T’Pring

t’sai prai ngiq’e

“lady who assumes acquisition”

T’Prol

t’sai pi’rolaya

“lady little reaction”

T’Prylla

t’sai pi’ryll-ha

“lady little ryll-vigor”; ryll is another word for ka’athaira, a Vulcan lute

T’Ra

t’sai ho-rah

“lady of ritual”

T’Rama

t’sai rahm vakh

“lady bold thunder”

T’Ranneha

t’sai rahm nehayan

“lady decaying thunder”

T’Raya

t’sai raya

“lady refuge”

T’Rea

t’sai Reah

“lady of Reah” (ancient goddess of death and bereavement)

T’Rehu

t’sai rehu

“lady of the three”

T’Rel

t’sai reldai

“lady priestess”

T’Reni

t’sai reh-ni’rch

“lady three fires”

T’Resik

t’sai reh-eshikh

“lady of three deserts”

T’Risa

t’sai rishan-ha

“lady of vigorous survival”

T’Ruhi

t’sai run-ihn

“lady dense dream”

T’Rya

t’sai ri’a’gra

“resolute lady”

T’Saaf

t’sai s’afersu

“lady from the founder”

T’Saan

t’sai sa’yon

“lady from out of the fire”

T’Sai

t’sai

“lady”

T’Sala

t’sai salan

“lady wind”

T’Sanvi

t’sai sanuk vik

“lady pleasant well”

T’Saen

t’sai sa’wein

“lady from out of the cover;” i.e., from the pages of a book, from legend

T’Saien

t’sai sa’igen

“lady from out of the sky/heavens”

T’Sehn

t’sai se’heikan

“lady of the declaration”

T’Sel

t’sai selk

“delta lady”

T’Selis

t’sai zhel-izh

“lady of the snowline”

T’Sey

t’sai seo’a

“lady who asserts”

T’Shael

t’sai s’ha’gel

“lady from the light”

T’Shanik

t’sai shan’hal’lik

“lady loved at first sight”

T’Shenn

t’sai shen

“lady of ascent”

T’Shevat

t’sai she’rak vat

“lady of the eastern vault”

T’Sri

t’sai srikh

“lady of the srikh” (a unit of currency)

T’Syra

t’sai s’iraktra

“lady from the expanse”

T’Thelaih

t’sai thol-vai

“holy noble lady”

T’Vaakis

t’sai vakh’es

“lady of boldness”

T’Vei

t’sai vai

“holy lady”

T’Vel

t’sai vel

“simple/uncomplicated lady”

T’Velar

t’sai fel-ar’kadan

“lady rower”

T’Veran

t’sai firan

“lady support”

T’Vhet

t’sai vet

“lady of doubt”

T’Via

t’sai vi ha

“lady who is life”

T’Vin

t’sai vi ne’shau

“lady who greets”

T’Vish

t’sai vishizhukel

“foundry lady”

T’Vora

t’sai kuvoran

“winding lady”

T’Vran

t’sai-varan

“storytelling lady”

T’Vria

t’sai vre-ha

“life-vessel lady”

T’Vysse

t’sai visak’a

“lady legacy”

T’Zan

t’sai zan

“lady of the view”

T’Zora

t’sai zhagra

“lady of the game”

Vulcan Personal Names (Part 9)

VULCAN MYSTICISM

Previously, we saw how nature has been revered in Vulcan names. In addition to the totem animals of tribes, names such as Stonn (stonn = “antler”), Tuvok (tu va’khen = “way of the mountain raptor”), T’Lara (t’sai lara = “lady blue desert bird”), and S’laron (s’lara-yon = “from the blue firebird”) show a reverence for wildlife. Likewise, the wind was respected for its strength, the seeds it carried, and the relief it brought from the heat. The element arev (“desert wind”) appears in several names: Evoras (arev-vohris = “desert breeze”), Aravik (arev vik = “well of the desert wind”), T’Ara (t’sai arev vakh = “lady bold desert wind”), Evekh (arev ekhlami = “surrounded by desert wind”), and Surev (s’uralaun arev = “from the singing desert wind”). The element salan (“wind”) as in T’Sala (t’sai salan = “lady wind”) was also used in naming traditions but less often.

Thunder occurs infrequently on Vulcan, but when it struck in ancient times, it must have been a terrifying force – painful to sensitive ears – to comprehend. Names such as T’Rama (t’sai rahm vakh = “lady thunder”) and N’Evran (nei arev-rahm = “seed of the desert thunder-wind”) pay homage to this natural phenomenon. Some scholars believe that the word for “thunder,” rahm, might have originally referred to the rumble of an earthquake or volcano.

Phenomena of the celestial realm did not escape Vulcan notice or fascination. The name element yel (star) is still common today. Selon (s’yel-yon = “from the star-fire”), Selik (s’yel’iki = “from the soul of the star”), Sorel (tsoraya-yel = “star cache”)1, and Selek (s’yel-ekon = “from the star-god”) are some of the oldest recorded Vulcan names, as is T’Pau (t’sai pau = “lady corona”). Other names also reference light: T’Shael (t’sai s’ha’gel = “lady from the light”), T’Hen (also rendered T’Hain, from ha’ge-igen = “lady sky-light”)2, and the curious name S’harien (s’harr-igen = “from the tail of the sky,” an expression thought to refer to the phenomenon of a sun pillar).

Vulcan personal names also point to a pantheon of prehistoric gods. Like many cultures on Earth, it was considered sacrilegious to take the name of a god or goddess. One was, after all, a servant of the divine. Examples of these names include T’Nedara (t’sai Natara = “lady of Natara,” god of water), T’Kosa (t’sai Khosaar = “lady of Khosaar,” a god of war), T’Gra (t’sai Gratan = “lady of Gratan,” a desert spirit), Serevan (s’Reah-van-kal = “from Reah’s ceremony,” a goddess of death and loss), and Refas (Reah-vash = “Reah’s terror” – a favorite among the te-Vikram brotherhood).

From the temple traditions come the names T’Sanik (t’sai sa’nikh = “lady from out of the Eye”)3 and T’Vria (t’sai vre-ha = “lady life-vessel”). But no name is more mystical than T’Plana-Hath (t’sai pla-nahan-a’Tha = “lady return-thinking to the direct experience of the Universe”). The only bearer of that name was the head of a school of Vulcan historians during the Sudocian Wars. Her History of Logic remains a standard text in Vulcan universities. Surak was one of her pupils.4

Next week, I’ll wrap up our study of Vulcan names with a list of the most common personal names and their meanings.

1 An early expression for “galaxy.”

2 i.e., a light in the sky, not an overhead window.

3 A reference to T’Khut, Vulcan’s sister planet.

4 The way of kolinahr: the Vulcans. (1998). Culver City, CA: Last Unicorn Games, p. 15.

Vulcan Personal Names (Part 8)

TROUBLED TIMES

Along with occupation, ancestry, and personal qualities, Vulcan names point sharply to a history of violence, food and water shortages, and social upheaval. Some of the oldest names come to us from the Ancient Vulcan language and express a basic struggle for survival. For example, Satak (sa’i’hatik = “from out of the surviving”), T’Risa (t’sai rishan-ha = “lady of vigorous survival”), and T’Aria (t’sai ha ri’a’gra = “lady of resolute life”) come to mind. On a planet where solar flares made farming impossible in some regions and unpredictable in others, hunger was an ever-present reality. Starvation ensued when supply lines were cut and trade embargos enforced. Two names celebrate the survival of hungry times: Tavin (t’avon = “of the hunger”) and Kerak (k’yerak = “with bowl,” i.e. “with food”). This last name may simply be an expression of hope that the next generation would not go hungry.

Hope was a luxury to most Vulcans but one they did not hesitate to share with their children and community. Names like Dzharok (also spelled Jarok in Federation Standard English; dzhar-rok = “lay/song of hope”) and Turak (tu-rok = “way of hope”) were popular in war-torn regions along the eastern shore of the Voroth Sea during the Second Dynasty. Specific wars and skirmishes were commemorated in personal names, such as Saavik (sa’ahkh-vik = “from out of the well-war”) and Surak (s’ur-ahkh = “from the tunnel-war”). One of the stories surrounding Surak’s birth is that on the night his mother went into labor, she was forced to make her way to the medical center through the tunnels beneath Shi’Kahr’s Old Town, but she almost didn’t make it. While the warlord Sudoc bombarded the city with missile strikes, suicide bombers forced their way into the tunnels. The majority of the Raalan missiles were shot down, but it took Shialan ground forces nine days to secure the tunnels and lava tubes beneath the city.

Another conflict from Surak’s time, noted in the Vulcan personal name Sasek, was the Sundering, when those who would become the Rihannsu left in generational ships to find a new home on Romulus. Sasek is formed from sa’Seheikk’ke, meaning literally “away from the Sundered,” an indication that the one who bore the name, or the parent who bestowed it, did not agree or associate with those who called themselves the Sundered.

As warlords vied for territory and natural resources, the victorious more often than not oppressed their conquered populations. Resistance cells developed, as is evidenced in names like Selden (s’el-tehnaya = “from the free resistance”) and Velekh (veh el’es ekhlami = “one surrounded by freedom”). The warrior was honored and boasted in many names, such as Senek (senepa-ekon = “knife-god”), Senkar (senepa kahr = “knife of the city”), T’Lyra (t’sai lirpa = “lady of the lirpa”), T’Amar (t’sai ahn’vahr = “lady of the double-edge sword”), Mahak (mah-vel + ak = “hammer-like), T’Vran (t’sai vi ran = “lady who kills”), and equally chilling monikers like Dvir (duv-hirat = “crimson shadow”). It’s no wonder that the name T’Vhet (t’sai vet = “lady of doubt”) became popular in Surak’s time.

Within the shadows of dark times, Vulcan mysticism flourished, offering a beacon of light for the hungry and oppressed. For my last installment on Vulcan personal names, I’ll point out those names which developed from Vulcan mystic and religious traditions.

Vulcan Personal Names (Part 7)

OCCUPATIONAL NAMES

Some of Vulcan’s oldest and most revered occupations are reflected in the names of its people. A similar custom exists in many of Earth’s cultures. Surnames such as Smith, Cooper, Taylor, Weaver, and Wright all come to mind from the English tradition. From the Vulcan fishing villages on the coasts of the Voroth and Thanor Seas, names such as T’Pavis (t’sai pa’visu = “lady around the nets”) and T’Velar (t’sai fel-ar’kadan = “lady rower”) were popular.

Other names sprang from markets and bazaars: Prisu (prisu = “braider”), Oratt (oradasu = “honorable spinner”), T’Mor (t’sai mor = “lady of the leaf”),1 T’Mar (t’sai mahr = “market lady”), and T’Kiha (t’sai ki’haf = “basket lady”). One name of particular interest that has survived from the great desert bazaars is T’Neithan (t’sai nei-pseth-thon = “lady of the dry-seed measure”). The weight of one hundred cholla seeds was used as a standard measure up until the First Dynasty. The precise and fair weighing of trade goods was regarded as a sacred occupation, as was farming. One who could bring forth food from barren soil was highly regarded indeed. Solor (solek-tor = “one who works the soil”) is one of the names that comes to us from the farming traditions.

Those who could build sound structures and keep encroaching dunes at bay were also well respected. Kovar (kov ar’kadan = “stone-worker”), Suvok (su-vok = “person of the level/a mason’s apprentice”), Sefor (sef + tor = “dune-maker/shaper”), and Varen (aber + in = “one who raises up/a builder”) are some of the oldest names from the construction trades. T’Vish (t’sai vishizhukel = “lady of the foundry”) is likewise a popular name from the skilled trades.

From the courts of kings and warlords come names such as Lhai (leshu hai-fan = “standard bearer”), Vareth (var ithag = “story expert”), Suter (su-terseht = “insignia-person/a herald”), Stepn (svep-dvinsu = “doorkeeper”), Sarissa (s’a’rs’a = from the dance/a dancer”), Sybok (svai-bah-ker = “master of the bloom-garden”),2 and Vorealt (vohris-ryll-torsu = “slow ryll-player”).3

Temple traditions have yielded an equally impressive array of personal names. A few examples include T’Rel (t’sai reldai = “lady of the priestess”), T’Ra (t’sai ho-rah = “lady of ritual”), Sarda (sa-reldai = “priest”), and Ladok, an interesting name from a phrase that means “here serves honorable god,” la dvin-tor oekon.

Perhaps the most fascinating of what could be considered occupational names is one which survives from Surak’s time: Skamandros (skamau mamut-rushan = “attracts conversion aid”). The “conversion” in reference here is the reformation begun by Surak. Skamandros was one of Surak’s confidents and often served as his bodyguard. He took the name in honor of Surak. His given name was Ayhan (vai yon = “holy fire”).4

And speaking of Surak’s time, there are many Vulcan names which bear witness to troubled times. I’ll take a look at those in my next post.

1”Leaf” is thought to be a reference to tea or herbs.

2 Literally “bloom-garden;” “master” is implied.

3 Ryll is another word for ka’athaira, the traditional Vulcan lute.

4 Sherman, J. & Shwartz, S. (2004). Vulcan’s soul, book one: Exodus. New York: Pocket Books.

Vulcan Personal Names (Part 6)

PERSONAL TRAITS

Like personal names from many Terran cultures, Vulcan names often describe a trait supposedly inherent in the individual. In ancient times, children were permitted to choose an adult name during a rite of passage, such as the kahs-wan. In modern Vulcan society, names no longer have the importance they once did. The same is true on Earth. For example, the name Gerald means “one who rules with a spear” and the Germanic nobleman who bore it was expected to be a bold warrior. Although spears are no long in use on Earth, the name still is. The name – like most names – is selected more for its sound when spoken than its meaning.

The simplest form “trait” names took was a single adjective, such as Vach (vakh = “bold”), Talok (taluhk = “precious”), and Varek (var+ek = “talkative”). Other “trait” names are formed by a noun and a qualifying adjective. Examples include Satok (sa tok = “fine male”), Tallera (talu lerash = “hard neck”), Skon (sohk-yon = “elegant fire”), Telas (tel-hasu = “telepathic being”), Azeraik (az’ir vaikar = “devoted mate”), and T’Karik (t’sai karik = “strong lady”). The first two in this list are most likely childhood names – Tallera given to a stubborn child – while the rest were likely chosen upon reaching adulthood.

Some ancient childhood names can seem harsh or cruel to modern sensibilities. The name Vethek (veh thek = “one who drops”) comes from the phrase ish-veh thek, meaning literally “that one drops,” was in all likelihood an indication of epilepsy or similar neurological disorder. Vanik (vaunik = “hesitant”), Voris (vohris = “slow”), Nivol (nikh-vul = “eye slant”), and Radak (ra dak = “what is cast out/outcast”) are other examples of undesirable traits, or so they seem to modern offworlders. But slanted, almond-shaped eyes were considered especially beautiful among many Vulcan clans, and traits such as slowness or hesitancy were noted with concern for the child’s well-being. Such names were given in the hopes that a child would outgrow or overcome a negative trait, especially if others were alerted to it and could assist the child. Radak would most certainly have been an adult name and one that was ritually assigned to an individual shunned from the community. However, the name survives to the present day due to the popularity of such outcasts in the past. Many, such as Surak, developed their own followings and started cultural revolutions.

As one might suspect, in ancient times, children were not often officially named until the age of two or three when personality and traits were more developed and recognizable. Some childhood names reflected great praise – for example, Sarek (sahr ek’ariben’es = “fast fluency”), Sarpk (sahr pakashogaya = “fast perception”), and Sorrd (sau rytemk = “one who radiates rytemk” (a state of healing). Even Storn (storaun = “developing, advancing”) was considered high praise.

Some further examples of adult names expressing personal traits include T’Laan (t’sai la’n’u = “lady who approves”), Pola (po’lahv = one who had the last word;” literally, “after-tongue”), Vyorin (vi orenau = “one who studies”), and Vorik (veh orfik-kel = “one of the ancestors”). This last name wouldn’t seem to be desirable to a modern Vulcan, but the name is ancient and evoked the strong, omniscient qualities of Vulcan’s legendary heroes and demigods.

Next time we’ll look at names which point to Vulcan’s highly valued occupations, past and present.