Color Me Calm

IMG_1766

Photo by pedrojperez.

The early twenty-first century included some of the most turbulent decades of Earth’s history. Terrorist plots and atrocities raised anxiety levels to an all-time high. Confusion reigned in the 2016 electoral face for the US Presidency as Republican candidate Donald Trump’s popularity soared. Immense global issues, such as global warming, fracking, and impending superbug epidemics, were deprived government funding for scientific investigation and neatly swept under the rug. If ever the nations of Earth needed strong leaders, it was then. No one, however, was emotionally prepared to deal with these crises.

Still, there is evidence that the early decades of the twenty-first century was a time when humans began to take a strong interest in controlling their emotions. Enrollment in yoga classes and religious retreats increased, but one particular movement took the world by storm. In 2015, Amazon.com reported that for the first time in the company’s history, a coloring book made the best-seller list. Everywhere adults picked up colored pencils and gel markers to return to an activity they once enjoyed in the care-free days of childhood. Humans discovered, as Vulcans did during the violent times when Surak lived, that creating art – even, and perhaps especially, at an elementary level – offered a release of tension and a way to spend time in mindful contemplation; a way to focus on the here and now away from the violence and despair. Earth’s coloring trend also provided a social outlet, bridging generation gaps and enticing youngsters away from electronic media and games to enjoy meaningful social contact with their cohorts and elders.

The situation on Vulcan was no different in Surak’s time. Despite the violence, the elemental arts, such as pottery, drawing, and calligraphy flourished. As on Earth, coloring books or tablets were created to help children unwind and learn basic concepts, such as the alphabet, as a precursor to reading.

Recently there has been a gathering interest in this particular Vulcan art form. Over the next two years, the College of Historical Studies at the Vulcan Science Academy’s Shi’Kahr campus will have the coloring tablet Kur’voh ish-veh hayalik (Color Me Calm) on display. The work was created by artist S’harien and was designed to teach Vulcan children the glyphs of the Seleyan script, in the manner of “A is for apple,” “B is for ball,” etc. The drawings feature highly stylized images of common but important objects – most from the natural world – from Vulcan life. The exhibition will also be available for viewing here and will feature a new page each month. The pages have been arranged in a pattern that will be familiar to speakers of Federation Standard English, with the alphabet starting with the glyph corresponding to A and ending with Z, instead of the traditional Vulcan sequence. Viewers will note that there is no glyph for J, Q, and X.

Visitors are welcome to download and print the pages for personal enjoyment, but the pages may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission of the copyright holder. Click on the links to the PDFs below.

Viewers should also note that the Seleyan script was only one of many popular Vulcan writing systems. It was one of a few that was adapted for computer use and can be downloaded here: http://www.dafont.com/vulcan-script.font. Another important script in Vulcan’s history was the Dzhaleyl script: https://kirshara.wordpress.com/2012/02/15/the-dzhaleyl-script/  To learn about Vulcan calligraphy, visit http://korsaya.org/vulcan-calligraphy.

Along with the fine arts, music also flourished in Surak’s time. To learn about the Vulcan musical tradition, please visit https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ralash-tanaf-VuhlkansuVulcan-Music/399311346930693. Many of Surak’s teachings have been set to music by T’Prion and are available through my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8kuP8GHIoLXI1RzhSn6lWA

Kur’voh ish-veh hayalik (Color Me Calm)

A is for arev (desert wind)

B is for bah-ker (garden)

C is for cir-cen (cactus)

D is for dunap (book)

E is for el’ru (hand)

F is for fau-yut (road)

G is for gad (day)

H is for heya (mountain)

I is for igen (sky)

K is for kahr (city)

L is for lap (tree)

M is for masu (water)

N is for nei (seed)

O is for oluhk (snake)

P is for pilash (river)

R is for ravot (insect)

S is for svep (door)

T is for tchol (bay)

Now We Shape the Wind

With the recovery of the Kir’Shara, containing the original teachingsT'Prion
of Surak, and the destruction of the Vulcan homeworld (T’Khasi), much study has been devoted recently to pre-Reform civilization – the Vulcan that existed before Surakian philosophy and discipline were widely accepted. The purpose of this intense study by surviving scholars serves not only to assist in the restoration of Vulcan society but also to provide assurance that it will continue into the future. It was not long ago that the biological and cultural connection between Vulcans and Romulans was kept secret – a secret that was nearly lost. During the time of the Sundering, those who rejected Surak left T’Khasi to found a homeworld on a distant planet. They continued on as pre-Reform Vulcans and developed a new civilization in which emotions went unchecked.

Now Vulcans are once again faced with rebuilding, restructuring, and preserving their society. By studying Vulcan’s past, her people will not be doomed to repeat its violence.

One of the more fascinating aspects of this project is the ancient wisdom that comes to light. As archival networks, databases, and primary source documents are recovered, examined, and restored, many facets of former Vulcan life – most unfamiliar to the modern Vulcan – are made available again for public analysis and consideration. Files and manuscripts that have long been forgotten or even lost are now coming again to the forefront.

One study currently under investigation is the music – passed down from generation to generation in a wholly oral fashion – preserved through Vulcan’s monastic tradition. The College of Historical Studies of the Vulcan Science Academy has contracted with singer/songwriter T’Prion, to study a cache of newly discovered journals and documents, and to compose new material encompassing sacred traditions.

To hear the first of these compositions, click on this link:

http://youtu.be/DqGrsQuuS5E

Lyrics in both Vuhlkansu and Federation Standard English are provided here:

Lyrics in Vulcan                                     Lyrics in English

The song I’kushizhau etek salan (Now We Shape the Wind), composed and sung by T’Prion, is based on three distinct musical traditions. The oldest, zhit-ralash-tanaf (word-music) is a spontaneous style performed only by priestesses, who received their inspiration from sacred texts. Here, T’Prion focused on the text of Part One of Surak’s First Analects. The words convey the struggle for survival in Vulcan’s harsh climate, the endless battles for precious resources and wars that nearly destroyed the planet, and the philosophy that saved it. I’kushizhau etek salan encapsulates the evolution of the Vulcan species.

The song also builds upon the tradition of shean-ralash (rising-sound). The key of each succeeding stanza is raised by a step or half-step, gradually elevating the song to the heavens.

The third musical tradition T’Prion studied for this composition is uralal-varlar (sung-stories), a type of narrative singing used for epic poems and heroic tales. Each of these traditions can be explored more fully in the writings of T’Prion. As the documents and translations become available, links will be provided here. Read the original Modern Golic Vulcan transcriptions of these writings and join the discussion:

http://korsaya.org/forum/?mingleforumaction=viewtopic&t=62.0

The images in the video accompanying I’kushizhau etek salan are ancient holo-images of Raalan life, dating to the Second Dynasty, restored here in two-dimensional format. The chimes heard at the end are believed to from the T’Shen Monastery.

What Does a Vulcan Listen To?

In the Earth year 1957, a Vulcan research vessel went down in CarbonMoodies Dead Can Dance Creek, Pennsylvania, with four crewmen aboard. Although the captain perished, officers Stron and T’Mir were later recovered without incident, but the fourth crewman was inadvertently left behind, believed by the Vulcan authorities to have also perished and his body adequately buried or incinerated.1 But this Vulcan male, anthropologist and navigator Mestral, managed to live on Earth for over a century before he was detected. He was promptly recovered after First Contact.

On April 5, 2063, the crew of the T’Plana-Hath not only detected Zefram Cochrane’s warp-drive signature but also Mestral’s life-signs and were directed to make contact with humanity and to retrieve Mestral. He was brought back to Vulcan for debriefing before the High Command, which was not only curious about his first-hand experience living among humans, but was also anxious to learn how much human behavior had polluted Mestral’s Vulcan bearing. At that time, many in the High Command had little hope for humanity and viewed humans with contempt.

The transcripts of the interviews with Mestral have just been declassified. Below is a segment covering a topic many humans find fascinating: what do Vulcans listen to? Or, more precisely, what human music does a Vulcan living on Earth in the late twentieth and the early twenty-first century, far removed from the culture of his homeworld, find acceptable and even…pleasing? This segment of the interrogation was conducted by Minister Sepek, who not only taught at the Vulcan Science Academy as Professor of Xenopsychology, but also served as Secretary for Offworld Affairs.

Sepek: Forty billion terabytes of data classified as music have been recovered from your personal devices. This unprecedented amount suggests that you spent considerable time listening to Terran music.

Mestral: That is a correct assumption.

Sepek: Do you find it…enjoyable?

Mestral: Yes.

Sepek: We selected for review two songs at random from the collection labeled “Popular Music.” They are titled Wild Thing and Disco Duck. We found no reason to preserve this category of Terran music in the Vulcan Archives. And yet you have collected 4,256,172 songs, including songs which predate your arrival on Earth. Enlighten us.

Mestral: I might point out, Ministers, that your sample size – given the extent of the collection – was inadequate and therefore your summation inconclusive. Terran popular music is highly varied in its presentation.

Sepek: Be that as it may….

Mestral: If you will allow me to present some further samples, I can demonstrate to you the high degree of skill and, in some cases, “Vulcanness” in popular Terran music.

[A brief discussion ensues among the High Command. The consensus is to allow Mestral to continue with his presentation. Links to the popular Youtube site containing the selected songs are embedded in this transcript.]

Sepek: Continue.

Mestral: The first group of Terran musicians I would like to present to you is the Moody Blues, active from the mid 1960s and into the early decades of the twenty-first century. Their music was hailed as “the thinking-man’s rock ‘n’ roll” and it was most popular during the Vietnam War.

Sepek: The name of this band suggests that its members or their music are highly emotional.

Mestral: Indeed. Many humans found their music a way to explore and go beyond their emotions to achieve a higher level of consciousness.

Sepek: Such a practice is dangerous. In order to achieve a higher state of consciousness, one must suppress the emotions.

Mestral: If I may demonstrate, Ministers, here is an example every Vulcan explorer can relate to.

[The assembly listens to Gypsy http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWuwUhSis1U]

Sepek: It is evident that you identified with the singer of this song.

Mestral: Justin Hayward?

Sepek: His name is not in question here, nor is the Vulcan emotional state evoked by this song. It is your judgment.

Mestral: If I may continue, Minister, I believe I can demonstrate that the Moody Blues represent humanity’s higher understanding of the universe.

Sepek: You may continue.

Mestral: Consider this sample.

[The assembly listens to Tuesday Afternoon http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3aphxaDZMg ]

Sepek: Correct me if I’m wrong, but this song dates to 1967, the very height of the counter-culture’s experimentation with psychedelic drugs. Does humanity need to ingest mind-altering substances to reach a higher state of consciousness? Is this humanity’s understanding of the universe?

Mestral: Not at all. Consider the work of the Dalai Lama.

Sepek: We are considering the work of the Moody Blues. Have you anything more to say about these Terran musicians?

Mestral: A good deal more. This next song demonstrates that these five musicians from England felt the interconnectedness of all humanity and humanity’s ultimate connection to the universe. Although the song is performed in a minor key, indicative of great loss and urgency, the lyrics suggest hope that all mankind will understand this oneness. It is then that hostilities will cease.

[The assembly listens to A Simple Game http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlnExthvVQE]

And if you will indulge me by listening to one last example by the Moody Blues, Ministers, this poem demonstrates that humanity is capable of understanding Surak’s teachings.

[The assembly listens to The Balance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBZ7-NUZoJc]

Sepek: Perhaps, but these are just five humans out of 256 billion. You spoke of a “Vulcanness” you found in Terran popular music. Please clarify.

Mestral: This next group of modern musicians known as Dead Can Dance….

Sepek: An ominous name.

Mestral: Their music features influences from multiple cultures and ancient traditions. This first song could have been written by a follower of Surak. Due to the deep echo effect, you may not be able to hear the lyrics, but the opening stanza is this:

We scaled the face of reason

                                To find at least one sign

                                That could reveal the true dimensions

                                Of life, lest we forget.

                                And maybe it’s easier to withdraw from life

                                With all of its misery and wretched lies

                                Away from harm.

 

[The assembly listens to Anywhere Out of the World https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdjqIBZoIEY ]

 

Surak teaches us, “It is not the withdrawal from our world that will save it, but instead the desire to go out and transform it.”2

Sepek: Indeed. I think we can all agree to mark this song for preservation. [There is a consensus among the High Command].

Mestral: I have other examples from Dead Can Dance, which several musicologists agree mimic ancient Vulcan traditions. This song, known as Cantara, is very close in instrumentation, vocalization, melody, and rhythm to the te-Vikram dance ritual used to evoke a state of euphoria. Only their priestly castes of the deep desert are allowed to perform the song, and until recently, it was a closely guarded ritual of the Brotherhood. Yet here is something very similar from Earth.

[The assembly listens to Cantara https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFcWwHPVy3s]

Sepek: Fascinating. Do you have an explanation as to how this close parallel between Vulcan and Earth music occurred?

Mestral: I do not. Nor can I explain how the song The Arrival and the Reunion resembles the chant performed in the fal-tor-pan ritual, in which the katra is reunited with the body.

[The assembly listens to The Arrival and the Reunion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJRsWErKCxA]

Sepek: Remarkable.

Mestral: I have two more examples of this parallel musical expression. I understand, Minister, that you listen to the compositions of the Vulcan flautist Selar.

Sepek: I do on occasion.

Mestral: Then you may hear some resemblance in this next instrumental piece by Dead Can Dance to his composition entitled The Hot Wind of Kir.

[The assembly listens to Windfall https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kg4AEPC4uqw]

Sepek: Truly astonishing. Are you suggesting, Mestral, that there has been a connection between Vulcan and Earth prior to First Contact and prior to your violation of the Prime Directive?

Mestral: I make no suggestions, Minister, only observations. Within the scientific community, the hypothesis put forth by the noted archaeologist Professor Richard Galen is generally accepted, namely that many humanoid species were seeded on their home planets by the ancient race referred to as The Preservers. Ancient Vulcan texts speak of the Vhorani, the Ancient Ones, who came from Vorta Vor, the Wellspring of Creation.3 And here, perhaps Dead Can Dance sing of them or of their offspring in this song.

[The assembly listens to Children of the Sun https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Z4uITELiqw . There follows a lengthy debate among the ministers until a consensus is reached.]

Sepek: We shall retain the recorded files of popular Earth music within the Vulcan Archives for future study. Your efforts to understand the human mind, Mestral, are noted here.

________________________

SOURCES

1ENT: Carbon Creek episode: http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Carbon_Creek_(episode)

2 Sherman, J. & Shwartz, S. (2004). Exodus. (Vuclan’s Soul: Book 1). New York: Pocket Books, p. 48.

3 The Way of Kolinahr: The Vulcans. (1998). Culver City, CA: Last Unicorn Games, p. 18-19.

From War to Knowledge: The Vulcan Science Academy

In Surak’s youth, there were centers of learning, but the Vulcan VSA Shi'KahrScience Academy did not yet exist. In its place stood a massive fortress complex known as Pelasht, named for the Phelsh’t, the ancient tribe which occupied the basalt cave and defended the oasis that became the city of Shi’Kahr.1  Vulcan education was centered in nearby temples and led by a pyllora, a word usually translated into Federation Standard English (FSE) as “mentor” or “guide.” One such pyllora was T’Plana-hath, whose dictum, “Logic is the cement of our civilization, with which we ascend from chaos using reason as our guide,” shaped the philosophy of Surak and the future of Vulcan.2 Surak was one of her prized pupils.

Surak himself became a pyllora at the Suta Temple, where he could be found on the steps spreading his message of logic and emotional restraint to a curious audience in the plaza below.3 Before a formal collegium developed around his school of thought, most of his early lectures were given in the open air in the shade of the temple. Eventually, his lectures became so popular that the old fortress was repurposed into vast halls to hold audiences of thousands. In 399, when Surak was 120 years old, it became the heart of the new Vulcan Science Academy. While he lived, Surak encouraged the study of all subjects and the application of logic to learning in order to reach a heightened understanding of the universe and its infinite possibilities. This ultimate quest for knowledge and truth led to the birth of the concept of IDIC, a leading dictum of the Academy to this day.4

It wasn’t long after Surak’s death in 481 that the campus of the VSA spread beyond the walls of Pelasht. Today this central core of the earliest building houses the administrative complex, along with the lecture halls, the archives, and visitors’ center. The silver-white domes and spires of ancient temples contain labs, classrooms, and offices, and blend with clusters of new facilities devoted to specific disciplines.5 Beyond the fortress complex, where public lectures and performances are held, only two other areas are open to the general public: the Archives and the Medical Center. The Medical Center serves as the main hospital for the city as well as a state-of-the-art research facility. Above its bronze gates on a plaque in flowing calligraphy is its simple mission statement, which reads: “Nam-tor hakaya svi’la na’fan-veh ma vi bolaya. (There is healing within for any who have need.)”6 The databases of the Archives serve as a repository of knowledge on a planetary scale, housing over 164 billion volumes. Offworld, the VSA Archives are often referred to as simply the Vulcan Archives. A few documents remain classified by the Minister of Defense, but the vast majority of the archival files are accessible to any who wish to do research.

In most cases, it is not difficult to gain access to other areas of the VSA. All visitors are asked to stop at the Visitors’ Center to gain admission. Tours of various colleges, labs, and research centers are easily arranged. A special stop on any tour of Pelasht is the stone building annexed on the west side. Archaeologists believe it originally served as an armory. Here T’Pau’s office is located, situated close to the bubbling spring. Outside the entrance one can find an interactive plaque featuring recordings in over 400 languages welcoming visitors and giving a brief history of the VSA. Here is an excerpt in FSE, recorded by Amanda Greyson:  “To this oasis in the desert, Surak came five thousand years ago with a small band of followers, to practice a new philosophy of nonviolence. It is said that when warrior bands approached, seeking to seize control of the precious source of water, Surak welcomed them and bid them drink their fill while he spoke to them of logic, and the peace found through emotional control…..The Academy grew up around the philosophers who followed Surak. Disciples came here to learn from them, and the first buildings are the ones clustered here about the spring. Over many centuries the Vulcan Academy of Sciences grew from this center into the huge complex you see today.”7

There are a few rooms, such as private offices, which are not open to the public and they are marked with signs only in Vulcan. All public spaces, including a small museum displaying some of Surak’s personal belongings, are marked with signs in multiple offworld languages.8 T’Pau often keeps a few relics from the museum in her office for study. At present these include scrolls written in Surak’s own hand.9 Offworlders are often puzzled as to why these writings were committed to a papyrus-like paper and the words hand-written in an ancient script when Surak had digital technology at his disposal and communicated with the masses through the nets. These scrolls were specifically created for the monks of the Kolinahru Monastery, who to this day lead an austere life and use no advanced or automated technology. The scrolls are currently on loan from the monastery for three more years and are displayed in the museum every tenth day.

Offworlders are surprised to find that classrooms, laboratories, dorm rooms, and other nonpublic areas of the campus are not marked with any signage. Instead, the Vulcan tradition is to use variations in texture and shades of color as cues to function and location.10

Following traditional Vulcan architecture, all interior rooms throughout the Academy complexes receive natural light through an elaborate system of skylights, even at ground-level and sub-surface locations in multistory buildings. The thick stone walls and minimalist transparent steel windows keep the interiors naturally cool. The acoustics of the lecture halls are such that no amplification is needed at the lectern or during theatrical or concert performances. The largest hall of the fortress complex, simply known as the Hall of Pelasht, is noted in many guidebooks as “one of the largest room in the known worlds – nearly half a mile long, a quarter mile across, five hundred feet up to the roof, and all carved out of the living stone, an ancient volcanic basalt.”11 Thousands of lamps recessed into the walls often remind visitors of distant stars.

Another of the Academy’s grand lecture hall complexes lies off campus on the other side of Shi’Kahr. Originally known as va’ne’meLakht (Hiding from the Rage), it was built as a place of refuge from sunstorms and was large enough to hold the entire population of the city and its environs just prior to Surak’s time – a time when there was a resurgence of solar activity. Today it is known as the Halls of the Voice and is constructed out of a smooth blue-grey stone known as bureki. The majority of the halls in this complex are located several hundred feet underground. They are cool in temperature and light but far from dark. Shafts, cut through the vaulted ceilings, allow sunlight to stream in slanting columns from ground level. The halls are mostly used today for the biggest lectures, debates, and meetings, in addition to many ceremonial occasions.12

The main campus, tucked away in Shi’Kahr’s oldest quarter is laid out so that its buildings, walkways, and green space make maximum use of the small plot of land. All VSA buildings are multi-story both above and below ground and are positioned so that the pedestrian has a view of most facilities from any one point on the carefully groomed pathways. The meditation gardens are open to all and no permission is needed to stroll or sit within their quiet beauty. Most species of trees planted on the grounds, such as lhm’ta and mah’ta, are actually giant herb specimens, according to their botanical classification. Other trees include the ancient flame-leaved induku, clustered near the fortress complex. The carpet-like blue-green groundcover is a plant known as kh’aa and may be walked upon. Unlike Earth’s lawn grass, it never needs cutting. The various fountains are programmed to display an endless variety of cones, parabolas, and hyperbolas through their water jets.13

The visitor is reminded that there are no parking facilities for vehicles of any kind. The closest structures are located in the adjacent government quarter. Shuttle services and grav-chairs are available for the non-ambulatory, and all campus buildings are connected through underground tunnels where it is always possible to escape the extreme heat of the day. There one will find cafés and full cafeteria services.

When attending lectures and other performances, it is important to remember that at the end of the presentation, there is no applause. It is customary to wait a few moments – to show respect to the speaker – before asking questions.14

It is hoped that your visit to the Vulcan Science Academy will be an enlightening and meaningful one. Below is a list of colleges and their corresponding departments, along with a map of the campus. Please direct your questions and requests for tour arrangements to Stepn, Head of Visitor Services.

Vulcan Science Academy: Shi’Kahr Campus

Vulcan Science Academy Map (click here)

College of Agriculture

  • Dept. of Agroforestry
  • Dept. of Conservation Biology
  • Dept. of Horticulture
  • Dept. of Hydroponics
  • Dept. of Soil Science
  • Dept. of Veterinary Science

College of Chemistry

  • Dept. of Analytical Chemistry
  • Dept. of Photochemistry
  • Dept. of Physical Chemistry
  • Dept. of Quantum Chemistry
  • Dept. of Theoretical Chemistry
  • Dept. of Thermochemistry

College of Computer Science

  • Dept. of Artificial Intelligence
  • Dept. of Computer Architecture
  • Dept. of Cryptology
  • Dept. of Holography and Optics
  • Dept. of Medical Imaging
  • Dept. of Network Engineering
  • Dept. of Plasma Engineering and Diagnostics
  • Dept. of Robotics
  • Dept. of Sensor Technology
  • Dept. of Software Engineering

College of Engineering and Applied Science

  • Dept. of Aerospace Engineering
  • Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences
  • Dept. of Chemical Engineering
  • Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Dept. of Electrical Engineering
  • Dept. of Industrial Science
  • Dept. of Macromolecular Science
  • Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
  • Dept. of Nanotechnology
  • Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences
  • Dept. of Photonics

College of Geophysics

  • Dept. of Aquatic Sciences
  • Dept. of Ecology
  • Dept. of Geochemistry
  • Dept. of Geology
  • Dept. of Geophysics and Seismology
  • Dept. of Meteorology
  • Dept. of Volcanology

College of Historical Studies

  • Dept. of Archaeology
  • Dept. of Architecture and Urban Planning
  • Dept. of Art and Music
  • Dept. of History
  • Dept. of Language and Linguistics
  • Dept. of Literature
  • Dept. of Museum Studies
  • Dept. of Paleontology
  • Dept. of Political Science
  • Dept. of Religion
  • Dept. of Sociology

College of Information Technology

  • Dept. of Archival Sciences
  • Dept. of Communications Engineering
  • Dept. of Infomatics and Information Theory
  • Dept. of Information Analysis and Retrieval
  • Dept. of Information Services

College of Mathematics

  • Dept. of Adaptive Systems
  • Dept. of Analysis
  • Dept. of Applied Mathematics
  • Dept. of Fluid Dynamics
  • Dept. of Mathematical Logic
  • Dept. of Probability Science
  • Dept. of Topology

College of Medicine and Life Sciences

  • Dept. of Biochemistry
  • Dept. of Biology
  • Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
  • Dept. of Biophysics
  • Dept. of Cardiology
  • Dept. of Dentistry
  • Dept. of Dietetics
  • Dept. of Endocrinology
  • Dept. of Experimental Medicine
  • Dept. of Genetics
  • Dept. of Geriatrics
  • Dept. of Internal Medicine and General Surgery
  • Dept. of Kinesiology
  • Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology
  • Dept. of Neurology and Neurosurgery
  • Dept. of Pediatrics
  • Dept. of Pathology and Toxicology
  • Dept. of Pharmacology and Therapeutics

College of Physics

  • Dept. of Applied Physics
  • Dept. of Astrophysics
  • Dept. of Nuclear and Subatomic Physics
  • Dept. of Quantum Physics
  • Dept. of Theoretical Physics

College of Thought

  • Dept. of Mental Disciplines
  • Dept. of Philosophy
  • Dept. of Psionics
  • Dept. of Psychology

College of Xenology

  • Dept. of Xenobiology
  • Dept. of Xenolinguistics
  • Dept. of Xenopsychology
  • Dept. of Xenosociology

_____________________

SOURCES

1 Duane, D. (1988). Spock’s  World. New York: Pocket Books, pp. 117, 126.

2 The Way of Kolinahr: The Vulcans. (1998). Culver City, CA: Last Unicorn Games, p. 15.

3 ibid, p. 55.

4 ibid, p. 56.

5 ibid, p. 57.

6 Sherman, J. & Shwartz, S. (1999). Vulcan’s Heart. New York: Pocket Books, p. 366.

7 Lorrah, J. (1984). The Vulcan Academy Murders. New York: Pocket Books, p. 183.

8 ibid, p. 185.

9 ibid, pp. 187-188.

10 Strickland, B. & B. (1996). Crisis on Vulcan. (Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books, p. 57.

11 Duane, D. (1988). Spock’s  World. New York: Pocket Books, p. 117.

12 ibid., pp. 184-185.

13 Strickland, B. & B. (1996). Crisis on Vulcan. (Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books, pp. 55-57.

14 Sherman, J. & Shwartz, S. (2004). Exodus. (Star Trek: Vucan’s Soul, Book 1). New York: Pocket Books, p. 143.

The Logic of the Forge

Recently, an excerpt from Surak’s teachings appeared in a publication commemorating the firstThe Forge 150 years of the United Federation of Planets. The selection is included as a sample of Vulcan philosophy and as an artifact of interest from one of the founding worlds. While the translation into Federation Standard English is satisfactory, the opening commentary is insufficient in detail to adequately introduce non-Vulcans to Surak’s writings. I would like to expand on and clarify that introduction here.

The journal entry featured in Federation: The First 150 Years is from a selection of writings typically referred to as The Logic of the The Forge, dating to the year 312 when Surak was 33 standard Vulcan years old. The entry is part of the Awakening phase of his life, after his family was killed and he lost his best friend Senet in the Sudocian Wars. While he took refuge in various part of Shi’Kahr, he was captured and tortured – not behind enemy lines – but by Shi’alan officials who believed he possessed military intelligence that would aid them in pinpointing the location of the mindlord Sudoc. Sudoc’s strikes on the region of Shi’al, and in particular the city of Shi’Kahr were Surak lived, were vicious and unrelenting. Shi’alan military officials sought to end the war by infiltrating Sudoc’s compound and executing the warlord. Sudoc knew they were getting close. Days earlier, his mind-controlled assassins penetrated Shi’Kahr and slaughtered several of its top-ranking officers, including General Solek, Surak’s father, and their households.

When they brought Surak in for questioning, they found him wandering the streets in a state of shock. He’d been out with his friends – one of whom was Senet – when Surak’s family was murdered. His confusion only increased when officials began interrogating him about his defection from the army. They accused him of desertion and, therefore, treason. They accused him of orchestrating his family’s murder. Surak, they said, deserted his position in the Shi’alan army and killed his own family because he was under the influence of Sudoc’s psychic powers. Stunned, Surak invoked the right of privilege. In those days, the sons and daughters of the wealthy were spared from the draft. Only a handful these young people freely chose to enter military service, preferring instead days of leisure. Surak was no exception and spent his youth enjoying games of strategy and debating the finer points of philosophy with a close circle of friends.

General Solek was so embarrassed by Surak’s lack of patriotism that he created a complete forgery of records detailing his son’s distinguished career in the army. Hence, the officials’ confusion and the comment in the aforementioned introduction: “The Vulcan philosopher Surak grew up in a world plagued by war and on the edge of self-destruction. As a young man, he fought in those wars in the infantry; he attributed much of his later philosophy to the changes he underwent during his ordeal.”[1]

This last statement is undeniably true.  In his journal, Surak wrote: “Vesht nam-tor nash-veh has-bosh fna’mesh; Nekal nash-veh agreibaya t’au, vesht tan-tor na’au ek’ro’fori ik psal au. I was sick over my humiliation; I had succumbed to their torture, given them all the information they had sought….”[2] In passages preceding the one quoted here, Surak described the nature of the information he had given the authorities and how that revelation affected him.

“I did have the information they sought,” he wrote, “for I had touched my father as he lay dying and saw it in his mind. I saw his hopes and his fears. I knew where Sudoc hid. I knew where all his wives and children were. I knew where his generals were, and all their wives and children. My father had learned their location through his operatives, who were also killed that night – before any of that intelligence could be utilized. With a few cowardly words, I sentenced them all to death.”

Later, when Surak began teaching peace and compassion in the crowded markets, he was often asked, “Why did you not rejoice at this information and give it eagerly? Here was your chance to destroy the man who destroyed your family and countless others.” Surak replied, “Does the destruction of the man who destroyed my family elevate me above him? Does the destruction of innocents for the sake of his execution absolve my conscience of the blood that has been spilled due to my words? Will not the survivors in his compound wish to retaliate? When will it end?”

Although Sudoc escaped the storming of his compound, the majority of his family was killed. During the raid, Surak managed to flee his cell and escaped through a series of tunnels into the neighboring kingdom of Lhai where he wandered the Forge for days until the search parties thought him dead.

In this journal entry, Surak wrote, “Katal nahp pa’svik mesh, heh vesht fai-tor hash-veh ta worla kupi hal-tor nash-veh na’ha-kel. The thought of my betrayal brought guilt, and I knew I could never go home.”[3] The betrayal he speaks of here is not only the betrayal of his close circle of friends but also the betrayal of self. At that point in his life, his friends had become his family, and during his incarceration, he had revealed their whereabouts through the pain of torture. They were all charged with sedition and wanted for questioning. But most of all, Surak was troubled by his betrayal of his own morals. By giving into his emotions and the pain, he failed to stand by his convictions, he later said.

One of the most interesting segments of this entry is Surak’s confession that he broke one of Vulcan’s ancient taboos. After he had wandered in the Forge for several days without food and water, he was awoken by a scout craft flying dangerously low overhead. Moments later, he witnessed its crash and ran to the crumpled fuselage to check for survivors. He pulled the bodies of two pilots – both dead – from the wreckage and searched the craft for survival rations and water but found none. “Thirst was overcoming me,” he wrote, “and I thought…I could drink their blood. It would allow me to survive. My religious upbringing considered this a violation of sacred law. If I did this and was discovered, I would be an outcast, I would be tried and executed.”[4]

Surak sat with the bodies for a long time, thirst and uncertainty gnawing at his mind. He thought of his home and his family of friends. He struggled to find meaning in his life and why he even might want to continue living. He thought of all the emotional states that had brought him to this place, that had brought all of Vulcan to this place, and began to formulate his renowned treatise on fear. The elimination of fear, he believed, was the key. He concluded, “Vesht pla-ash-tor nash-veh s’riklopaya; u’samu-esh, khal ozhika eh vesht var-tor ozhika nash-veh rish-tor. Vesht mon-tor nash-veh plak, visolektal nash-veh vukhutlar heh fa’lefator nash-veh. I stepped back from my indecision; like a cool breath, logic took over and told me to survive. I drank the blood, buried the bodies, and continued on.”[5]

Surak’s treatise on fear remains to this day one of the most influential pieces of Vulcan literature.

While copyright restrictions prevent me from posting the FSE translation of Surak’s journal entry, here is the original in Traditional Golic Vulcan:  Ozhika t’ah’Hrak


[1] An Excerpt from the Teachings of Surak in Goodman, David A. (2012). Star Trek: Federation: The First 150 Years. London: Titan Books, p. 17)

[2] ibid, p. 19.

[3] ibid.

[4] ibid.

[5] ibid.

Archaeological Find Linked to Surak

The Vulcan Science Academy has gained access to a section of tunnel deep beneath the city of Surak's Mug 1Shi’Kahr during an excavation sponsored by the T’Planna-Hath Historical Society. When the Society announced that it expected to link the tunnel to Surak, the excavation was funded in part by House Sekir, the dynastic family to which Surak belonged. While it has long been thought that the 2,567.83 kilometers of tunnels beneath Shi’al’s capital city had all been mapped, a previously unknown section, 15.91 km in length, was revealed to structural engineers after the T’keKhuti Quake. For millennia, the tunnels served as drainage conduits in rare but devastating floods, as well as escape routs and sally ports in times of war. They were places of refuge for the homeless, petty thieves, and smugglers. During Surak’s time, the tunnels had a dark and lawless life of their own. The Shi’Kahran government was too preoccupied with repelling the Sudocian invasion to patrol the seedy underground. In fact, officials had a mutual understanding with the gangs that prowled the tunnels, who efficiently defended these networks of caverns against foreign commando strikes and infiltration.

Although Surak never wrote about his experience in the tunnels, a few who encountered him there did. On more than one occasion, he used the tunnels to escape angry mobs in the city streets when impromptu gatherings and lectures drew violent opposition. As his popularity grew, civilian authorities considered his public teachings such a nuisance that they sought to arrest him for inciting riots, but they always lost his trail in the sprawling labyrinth of tunnels. There Surak and his followers found an enclave of supporters who could quickly smuggle them to a safe haven and cover their tracks.

Years later, upon his death, 5,786,411 people signed the online remembrance book, jamming the nets for 3.71 days. In that guestbook, preserved in the Academy archives, is an entry by T’Vei who wrote, “I shall never forget the day Surak suddenly appeared among us. I had previously seen him from afar and was familiar with his image posted on the nets, but he was much smaller than I’d imagined, and at first I didn’t believe it was him. He was very thin, for he was constantly on the move in those days. He had come through the tunnel leading to the storage chamber beneath my studio. My family mostly used it as a shelter from air strikes during the war.

“The day Surak came, I was preparing glazes for a series of firepots commissioned by the Suta Temple. He inclined his head and said, ‘I ask forgiveness. My days are not mine and I have no wish to disturb yours.’ He was not hurt, but one of his two companions had a cut over one eye. They had escaped a disagreeable crowd that corned them in the market. ‘We lost the fruit and bread we had purchased,’ the one with the cut said, ‘but not our honor.’

“I gave them fire and water in the custom of old and we shared a meal of mashya and fire-fruit. When they left in the middle of the night, I gave Surak a cup I had designed for the temple priests. Again, he inclined his head, and accepting the cup, he said, ‘What we begin here will alter the face of our world. Live long and prosper, t’hy’la.’”

T’Vei went on to write, “Surak and his companions carried very little with them, obtaining what they needed in exchange for their teachings. But Surak tied the cup to his belt with a scrap of cloth and it went everywhere with him. Every time I caught a glimpse of him on the nets, it was either cradled in his hands or tied to his belt. I was told later that he would drink from no other vessel – to minimize the risk of being poisoned.”

Surak's Mug 2T’Vei became one of Vulcan’s most famous potters, and much of her work can now be seen in the T’Sar Museum. The Suta Temple kept careful records of the work commissioned from her, and because of these records, the fragments of the cup found in the recent excavation have been identified as originated from her studio. DNA analysis of the residual protein molecules adhering to the glaze has revealed that the cup had been used by Surak and handled to a lesser degree by T’Vei. In a journal entry made accessible by T’Vei’s estate, she noted that the cup was returned to her following the death of Surak and kept as a prized possession on a shelf in her studio. The cup was presumed lost when the studio was destroyed in an earthquake. Although she had the means to hire a salvage crew, she allowed the city to fill in the area and retired from her craft. “Surak always said, ‘Kaiidth – what is, is,’ she wrote, ending her journal entry.

Surak’s cup, along with several other artifacts currently under study at the VSA, will arrive later this year as part of a special exhibit at the T’Sar Museum entitled: Surak: The Tunnel Years.

A List of Vulcan Names

As promised, we’re finishing up our discussion of Vulcan personal names with a list of the most common and notable names throughout history, along with their etymology and meaning. The list is broken up, alphabetically,  into three sections: A-R, T-Z, with separate lists for names starting with S and names containing the T’ prefix — as is common for Vulcan directories.

This list is by no means comprehensive and will be updated as time allows. If you’re interested in the etymology or meaning of a name that does not appear on this list, or if you’d like to know the source for a particular name, please feel free to email me. Some meanings are rather obscure, especially to offworlders, and I may be able to shed some additional light on certain traditions. I welcome your inquiries: sidzhan.tgai@gmail.com

NAMES A- R, T-Z

FEDERATION STANDARD

GOLIC VULCAN

DERIVED MEANING

Adenkar

adun karik

“strong husband”

Alieth

al’rig-pseth

“desert-branch”

Aloran

ashal-orensu

“beloved student”

Anauk

ha nauk

“cries vigorously”

Aravik

arev vik

“desert-wind well”

Arev

arev

“desert wind”

Asil

asal

“morning”

Avarak

aber-rok

“one who raises hope”

Avarin

aber+in

“one who lifts/raises”

Awidat

vakh wi datorik

“bold yet prepared”

Ayhan

vai yon

“holy fire”

Azeraik

az’ir-vaikar

“devoted mate”

Balev

ba-lahv

“traditional tongue”

Chu’lak

khau-lakh

“one who has command of language”

Delvok

dvelan vokaya

“will of memory”

Denak

dvinsu ekon-ak

“servant of the divine eye”

Dvir

duv-hirat

“crimson shadow”

Dzharok

dzhar-rok

“lay/song of hope”

Dzhossen

dvinsu zul-os-yon

“servant of the old lava fire”

Elieth

elik pseth

“free desert”

Elonat

el-on-natya

“both different and free”

Evekh

arev ekhlami

“surrounded by desert wind”

Evoras

arev vohris

“desert breeze”

Falor

fal+tor

“one who makes hot; bellows-worker”

Fer’at

feretausu

“gatherer”

Galsh

gal-en-shi

(from the) “moss place”

Grake

grei-faitik

“esoteric”

Grelek

kril’es-ek

“total harmony”

Haadok

ha-dahkuh

“two-life; twin”

Hanesh

feihan eshikh

“boss of the desert”

Harauk

ha taurauk

“amazing life”

Iria

hirat vre-ha

“crimson life-vessel”

Ivek

heya-vik

“mountain well”

Karatek

nakaratik

“endeavoring”

Kawarda

kahwa’ra-de

“similar mind;” name given to a twin

Kerak

k’yerak

“with bowl” (i.e., one who won’t go hungry)

Kesh

rik’esh

“without breath”

Kiri-kin-tha

kiri-kin than-tha

“golden one from Kir who guides children through their first meld”

Koss

rik’koshvar

“without disaster”

Kov

kov

“stone”

Kovar

kov ar’kadan

“stone worker”

Kuvak

ku vakh

“bold palm”

L’Nel

leshu nel-dath

“bearer of the pattern”

L’Vor

leshu va’orenan

“bearer of infinite learning”

Ladok

la dvin-tor oekon

“here serves the honorable god”

Lerius

leshu e’rroi’es

“bearer of attraction”

Lhai

leshu hai-fan

“banner carrier”

Lodzhal

leshu ozhika ashal

“bearer of beloved logic”

Lorian

leshu ro’fori+an

“bearer of information”

Lorot

leshu ro’fori ovsot

“bearer of complete information”

Lovar

lofik ar’kadan

“purposeful worker”

Lyras

lesh zherka hasu

“being who carries emotion”

M’Fau

maat fau

“clan who rides; The Riders”

Mahak

mahvel+ak

“hammer-like”

Menos

menal os

“(from the ) old cliff”

Mestral

mes-tor ye-halek

“one who crosses the galaxy”

Metana

maat-ta’an

“gift of the clan”

Mishih

mishitra hiyasu

“equipment expert”

Mitrani

m’aih toranik

“busy mother”

Muroc

mu-yor rok

“night hope”

N’Ereon

nei fer-yon

“seed of the fire-generation”

N’Evran

nei arev-rahm

“seed of the desert thunder-wind”

N’Keth

nei k’pseth

“desert seed”

N’Livek

nei li-wun-veh

“seed of the one with the lance”

N’Maret

nei mahr-ret

“seed of the market”

N’Oblan

nei opla-ang’dzhmizm

“seed of the honorable rear captain”

N’Rayek

nei Reah-yai-ek

“seed of Reah’s flame”

N’Vea

nei vi ha

“seed which is life”

N’Veyan

nei veh-yon

“seed of the flaming one”

Nesheh

veh neseshau

“one who deduces”

Nirak

nirak

“fool”

Nivol

nikh-vul

“eye-slant”

Nomikh

nei omekh

“seed of honorable parent”

Nu’Val

nei uzh-vahlsu

“seed of the new bestower”

Oratt

oradasu

“honorable spinner”

Paradaik

pa ra dakh

“the one around what is cast out”

Pekev

puhku gef

“(from the) amber coast”

Perren

perren

“actor”

Pola

po’lahv

“one who has the last word”

Prisu

prisu

“braider”

Radak

ra dak

“what is cast out”; an outcast

Radzhek

razhek

“awl”

Raelyek

Raal-yai-ek

“Raalan flame”

Ravanok

rarav-kanok

“every song”

Refas

Reah-vash

“Reah-terror”

Rekan

rehr-kan

“third child”

Romar

rom-ar’kadan

“good worker”

Rovalat

rok vahl lakht

“a grant of hope in the 10th month”

Tallera

talu lerash

“hard neck”

Talok

taluhk

“precious”

Tasav

tah-savas

“unobtainable fruit”

Taurik

taurau+ik

“amazing”

Tavek

tah va’khen

“unobtainable mountain raptor”

Tavin

t’avon

“of the hunger/famine”

Tekav

teker-khaf

“deviant blood”

Teknat

tehk-natya

“different sprout”

Telas

tel-hasu

“telepathic being”

Tellus

tel’es

“embodiment of the telepathic bond”

Tes

tesmur

“to prosper”

Teska

tehs-kau-bosh

“deceit-wise”

Tevik

dif-vik

“long-life well”

Tok

tok

“fine”

Tolaris

t’olara’es

“of the honorable blue” (house color)

Tolek

t’oluhk (maat)

“of the snake (clan)”

Torin

tor+in

“doer/ maker”

Tos

to-sai

“cloak/cloaked one”

Tu’Pari

tu pa’ritsuri

“the way around the unusual”

Turak

tu-rok

“way of hope”

Tuvok

tu va’khen

“way of the mountain raptor”

V’Lar

veh leshu a’riv’ne

“one who is bearer of a’riv’ne”

V’Las

veh leshu asenara

“one who is bearer of the lantern”

Vach

vakh

“bold”

Valeris

va’lerash’es

“immeasurable hardness”

Vanik

vaunik

“hesitant”

Varek

var+ek

“talkative”

Varekat

varu eik katausu

“broad storyteller”

Varen

aber+in; a variant of Avarin

“one who raises up”

Varith

var ithag

“story challenger/expert”

Vedzhat

veh-zad

“forbidden one”

Vektan

duvek ta’an

“shade gift”

Velekh

veh el’es ekhlami

“one surrounded by freedom”

Velik

velik

“simple/uncomplicated”

Verrin

ver-tor+in

“one who edits/editor”

Vethek

veh thek

“one who drops;” an indication of epilepsy

Vorant

vai oren-tor

“to learn (is) holy”

Vorealt

vohris ryll-torsu

“slow ryll-player;” a ryll is a ka’athaira, a Vulcan lute

Vorik

veh orfik-kel

“one of the ancestors; a throw-back”

Voris

vohris

“slow/methodical”

Vyorin

vi orenau

“one who studies”

Ych’a

yel tsatik

“secret star”

Yehenik

yai-enek

“fire-pain”

Yiluv

yel-ulef

“half-star”

Yuris

ur-is

“one who uses tunnels”

Zebed

za’bezhun

“behind-eye;” one who can see into the past or has “eyes” on the back of his head

Zerin

zeh-hir run

“onyx dream”

Zhi’rev

zhai arev

“grey wind”

NAMES starting with S

At the time of the Sundering, 28.6% of Vulcan’s population had taken S names to honor Surak.

S’harien

s’harr-igen

“from the tail of the sky (sun-tower)”

S’chn

s’khart-lan

“from the captain”

S’laron

s’lara-yon

“from the fire-bird”

S’lovan

s’lo’uk van-kal

“from the great ceremony”

S’rivas

s’ri’vas

“from no relief”

S’t’kal

s’t’sai kal’i

“from the lady of the challenge”

S’task

s’tcha-ihsek

“from the curling fog”

S’tvan

s’tviyan

“from the core”

S’vec

s’vik

“from the well”

S’wek

s’awek

“from out of solitude”

Saavik

sa’ahkh-vik

“from the well-war”

Sadzhik

sa’dzhasifik

“from out of jasif crystal”

Sakht

sakkhet

“longevity”

Sakkath

sakkhet-dath

“tendency towards longevity”

Sakonna

sakunotau

“one who extrapolates”

Sakorn

sakan oren

“spreading learning”

Salet

salatik

“indigenous/native”

Salkath

salan-k’rhth’a

“k’rhth’a- wind”; k’rhth’a is an herb

Salok

s’aluk (maat)

“from the fish (clan)”

Salvir

s’al vi ir

“from a distant male relative”

Sanshiin

sa(su)-na’shi’igen

“man at sky-place”

Sarda

sa-reldai

“priest”

Sarek

sahr ek’ariben’es

“fast fluency”

Sarissa

s’a’rs’a

“from the dance;” a dancer

Saros

s’arev-os

“from the old desert wind”

Sarpk

sahr pakashogaya

“fast perception”

Sasak

sa’sakkhet

“from out of longevity”

Sasek

sa’Seheikk’he

“away from the Sundred”

Sasav

sa’savas-shi

“from out of the fruit-place”

Satak

sa’i’hatik

“from out of the surviving”

Satat

sa’Tat’Sahr

“from out of Tat’Sahr”

Satelk

sa’telik

“from out of the bonded”

Satok

sa-tok

“fine male”

Savar

savarun

“digression”

Savel

sahriv-yel

“storm-star”

Savesh

sa’veshtaya

“outside of experience”

Saya

saya

“radiation/brilliance”

Scorus

ruskaraun’es

“embodiment of grasping”

Sefor

sef+tor

“dune-maker/shaper”

Segon

s’eik yon

“from the wide fire”

Sehlk

selk

“delta”

Sek

sek

“outlet/stream”

Sekir

s’sek-hirat

“from the crimson outlet/stream;”

Sekla

sek lamekh

“warm outlet/stream”

Selar

s’el-arev

“from the free desert wind”

Selden

s’el-tehnaya

“from the free resistance”

Selek

s’yel-ekon

“from the star-god”

Selik

s’yel i’ki

“from the soul of the star”

Selok

s’el-oekon

“from the free honorable god”

Selon

s’yel-yon

“from the star-fire”

Seltar

s’selk tor

“from the long delta”

Selv

s’el-veh

“from the free one”

Senak

senepa-ak

“knife-eye;” one who has a sharp eye

Sendet

senepa dator

“prepares senepa;” a knife-maker

Senek

senepa ekon

“knife god”

Senet

senepa-yeht

“knife-true”

Senkar

senepa kahr

“knife of the city”

Senor

seo’an+tor

“one who asserts”

Senva

senepa-vakh

“knife-bold”

Separ

senepa ar’kadan

“knife worker”

Sepek

sef-pelq

“dune captain”

Sepel

sep-wafikh el(ik)

“one who freely agrees

Sered

s’ir-ith’du

“from the distant camp”

Serevan

s’Reah van-kal

“from Reah’s ceremony”

Sern

asenara

“lantern”

Seroni

s’rom-nikh

“from the one with the good eye”

Sesenek

ses’ik ne ki’ne

“accountable sword-brother”

Setek

s’set-eik

“from the wide drop”

Sethan

s’pseth a’nirih

“from the desert father”

Sevennin

s’fen-igen

“from the sky-seal;” the Sky Clan used an emblem of the sky as their official seal.

Sev

seveh

“prosperity”

Sevek

seveh-ek

“total prosperity”

Sevel

seveh yel

“star of prosperity”

Seyhan

sihaunsu

“betting person”

Shanak

shan’hal’lak

“love at first-sight”

Shath

shen a’Tha

“ascent from the direct experience of the universe”

Shinat

s’shi Natara

“from the place of Natara” (god of water)

Shupal

shu-pal

“source”

Sidak

si’dahkuh

“from out of two”

Sidzhan

s’i’tsan

“from the bridge;” a reference to Seleya

Sihek

s’ihsek

“from the fog”

Sikan

s’ikun

“from the cone (volcano)”

Silek

si’lehk

“outside of ten;” a reference to the ten wells of the Shi’Kahr oasis

Silok

s’igen lo’uk

“from the great sky”

Simar

si’mahr

“outside the market”

Simora

si’mor-vakh

“outside bold leaf” (may refer to a place)

Sinak

s’igen-ak

“from the sky-eye” (a reference to T’Khut)

Sirak

s’irak-shi

“from the distant place”

Sirok

si’rok

“outside  hope”

Sitak

s’i’hatik

“from the surviving”

Sitar

s’itar-bosh

“from the thankful”

Sitok

s’igan tauk

“from the sky-cave”

Sivath

si’vath

“outside other;” outsider

Skamandros

skamau mamut-rushan

“one who attracts conversion-aid”

Skaren

s’ka-ran-zhi

“from the cactus”

Skep

s’kep

“from the gong”

Skitra

skil trau

“honest victory”

Sklar

skladantra ar’kadan

“message system specialist”

Skon

sohk-yon

“elegant fire”

Snil

s’nik’el

“from the convoy”

Sobek

s’obek

“from the honorable wait” (i.e., conceived during pon farr); variant of Sopek;

Sodok

s’otauk

“from the honorable cave”

Sofek

s’ofek

“from the honorable staff/scepter”

Sokel

sohk-yel

“elegant star”

Solek

s’oluhk(maat)

“from the snake clan”

Solen

s’oleh-nau

“from the honorable nineteen (a squad of martyred heroes)”

Solin

s’solai-igen

“from the sky-field”

Solkar

solai-kar

“field arm;” a field hand

Solok

shasol+ok

“rural, pagan”

Solor

solek-tor

“one who works the soil”

Sonak

s’on ahkhu

“from both wars”

Sopeg

s’obek

“from the honorable wait” (i.e., conceived during pon farr); variant of Sobek

Sopek

s’obek

“from the honorable wait” (i.e., conceived during pon farr); variant of Sobek

Soral

sa’Raal

“out of Raal”

Sorahl

sa’Raal

“out of Raal;” a variant of Soral

Soran

tsoraya+an

“cache”

Sorek

so-reshek

“insane”

Sorel

tsoraya yel

“star cache”

Sorn

s’orensu

“from the student”

Sorrd

sau rytemk

“one who radiates rytemk” (state of healing)

Sotir

s’otir

“from the dry lake bed”

Soton

ovsot yon

“complete fire”

Soval

s’oveh ashal

“from the honored beloved one”

Sovar

sov ar’kadan

“air worker”

Sovik

s’ovik

“from the honorable well”

Spahn

spoh ahnsu

“pale combatant”

Spelak

s’pi’halek

“from the little wheel”

Spet

s’petakov

“from the darling one”

Spock

spo’k’hat’n’dlawa

“resembling half of each other’s heart and soul”

Sreil

s’reldai

“from the priestess”

Stak

s’ta’Krat

“from the seventh month”

Stalat

s’t’lakht

“from the tenth month”

Stalek

s’taluhk

“from the precious one”

Stark

s’tah rok

“from unobtainable hope”

Stavel

s’tauf-el

“from the free ridge”

Stavin

s’tauf-hinek

“from the bone ridge”

Stef

s’tev’rak

“from the west”

Stel

s’tel

“from the bond”

Stelev

stegel arev

“stiff desert wind”

Stell

s’ti-yel

“from the star-spear”

Stepn

svep-dvinsu

“doorkeeper”

Stimm

s’temep

“from the gate”

Stonn

stonn

“antler”

Storn

storaun

“developing/advancing”

Streon

storik-yon

“advanced fire”

Strom

s’trufemu

“from the martyr”

Stron

stron

“escape”

Sudoc

s’udohk

“from the river-mist”

Suhur

su huhrik

“highest-ranking person”

Sulen

su’elan

“emancipation”

Sunak

suk’nak

“big cheek”

Sunok

su-nok

“concrete-person/worker

Sunvar

su nah-tor varu

“person who thinks tales”

Surak

s’ur’ahkh

“from the tunnel war”

Surev

s’uralaun arev

“from the singing desert wind”

Suter

su terseht

“insignia person”; a herald

Sutok

su-tauk

“cave-person”

Suvel

su-dvel

“choice-person; selector”

Suvin

su vinik

“mature person”

Suvok

su-vok

“level-person;” a mason’s apprentice

Suvuk

su-ulef-uk

“half-digit person”

Svaid

svai-tor

“to bloom”

Sybok

svai-bah-ker

“(master of the ) bloom garden”

Syrilius

si’rilokav’es

“outside of fallacy”

Syrran

s’yar-Arlanga

“from the grassy Arlanga Mountains

Syvar

svai-vafersu

“bloom regenerator; gardener”

NAMES starting with T’ prefix

T’Aimnu

t’sai aikum nu’ri

“lady of the young moon”

T’Alaro

t’sai ashal-Ah’rak

“lady of beloved Vulcan”

T’Aloren

t’sai ashal-orensu

“lady of the beloved student”

T’Amar

t’sai ahn’vahr

“lady of the double-edged sword”

T’Ara

t’sai arev vakh

“lady bold desert wind”

T’Aria

t’sai ha ri’a’gra

“lady resolute life”

T’Arvot

t’sai arev-odva

“lady of the desert-wind faith”

T’Dar

t’sai dahr

“secondary lady” (of the house)

T’Deata

t’da’a’tja

“of the dark pebble”

T’Dess

t’sai desh-rak

“lady of the north”

T’Enne

t’sai en’ahr’at

“lady godparent”

T’Evoryn

t’sai teh-vohr-runu

“lady of one hundred halting dreams”

T’Gai

t’sai gadzhai

“lady of the feast”

T’Gra

t’sai Gratan

“lady of Gratan” (a mythological desert spirit)

T’Hen

t’sai ha’e-igen

“lady sky-light,” i.e., a light in the sky (not a light in the ceiling)

T’Kar

t’sai kahr

“city lady”

T’Karik

t’sai karik

“strong lady”

T’Karra

t’sai kar-vakh

“lady bold-arm”

T’Kin

t’sai kin-kuhr

“golden lady”

T’Kiha

t’sai ki-haf

“basket lady”

T’Klaas

t’klashausu asal

“of the morning guard”

T’Klass

t’klashausu

“of the guard”

T’Kosa

t’sai khosaar

“lady of Khosaar” (an ancient god of war)

T’Laan

t’sai la’n’u

“lady who approves”

T’Lak

t’sai lakh

“lady of language”

T’Lan

t’sai lan

“lady of rank”

T’Lar

t’sai lara

“lady blue desert bird;” an shortened form of T’Lara

T’Lara

t’sai lara

“lady blue desert bird”

T’Larn

t’sai lara-ain

“lady of the dazzling blue garment”

T’Leia

t’sai leshu iyula

“lady bearer of culture”

T’Leiar

t’sai leshu yar

“lady bearer of grass/green”

T’Leng

t’sai leshu an’jmizn

“lady bearer of the captain”

T’Lera

t’sai lerashan

“lady consolidation”

T’Les

t’sai les

“target lady”

T’Lie

t’sai limein

“lady of the mask”

T’Lil

t’sai leh-hilek

“lady ten-shovels”

T’Liri

t’sai leshu ir-izh

“lady bearer of distant snow”

T’Lona

t’sai lo’uk-nahp

“lady of great thought”

T’Loran

t’sai  leshu orenan

“lady bearer of learning”

T’Lores

t’sai leshu fator’es

“lady bearer of continuity”

T’Lura

t’sai leshu uralaun

“lady bearer of singing”

T’Lyra

t’sai lirpa

“lady of the lirpa (a traditional Vulcan weapon)”

T’Madh

t’sai mathu

“lady of the scale”

T’Mal

t’sai malat

“nature lady”

T’Mar

t’sai mahr

“lady of the market

T’Maran

t’sai mahran

“lady of buying”

T’Meni

t’sai men-hilsu

“lady investigator”

T’Mihn

t’sai maat i’ni

“lady of the copper clan”

T’Mir

t’sai maat irak

“lady of the distant clan”

T’Mirek

t’sai maat ri-ek’traik

“lady of the ethereal clan”

T’Mor

t’sai mor

“leaf lady;” an herbalist or tea merchant

T’Nedara

t’sai Natara

“lady of Natara”

 (ancient god of water)

T’Neithan

t’sai nei-pseth-thon

“lady of the dry-seed-measure”

T’Neveith

t’sai nuf-ithag

“lady case expert”

T’Olryn

t’sai oleshu runu

“lady honored bearer of dreams”

T’Paal

t’sai pa’alem-masu

“lady around the saltwater”

T’Pak

t’pagun

“of the duel”

T’Pan

t’sai panah

“lady who considers”

T’Par

t’sai paribaya

“lady of discussion”

T’Para

t’sai pa’rau-nol

“lady around the refuge”

T’Parel

t’sai pa’reldai

“lady around the priestess;” an acolyte

T’Partha

t’sai pa’a’ri’a’Tha

“lady around the correct experience of the universe”

T’Pau

t’sai pau

“lady corona”

T’Pavis

t’sai pa’vis

“lady around the (fishing) net”

T’Pei

t’sai pi-feh

“lady of the little peak”

T’Peia

t’sai pa’eitaya

“lady around the shear”

T’Pel

t’sai pelal

“lady of the robe”

T’Pelek

t’sai pelal eik

“lady of the wide robe”

T’Penna

t’sai pi’en’ahr’at

“little lady godparent”

T’Peyra

t’sai pi’yai Reah

“lady little flame of Reah” (ancient goddess of death)

T’Pina

t’sai pi’nartaya

“lady little embrace”

T’Pir

t’sai pi’hirat

“little crimson lady”

T’Plana-Hath

t’sai pla-nahan-a’Tha

“lady return-thinking to the direct experience of the universe”

T’Pol

t’sai pollu

“lady of the pollu bush”

T’Pren

t’sai pi’run

“lady little dream”

T’Preth

t’sai per-ithop

“actress”

T’Pri

t’sai pi’ri’a’gra

“little resolute lady”

T’Pris

t’sai pris

“lady of the braid”

T’Pring

t’sai prai ngiq’e

“lady who assumes acquisition”

T’Prol

t’sai pi’rolaya

“lady little reaction”

T’Prylla

t’sai pi’ryll-ha

“lady little ryll-vigor”; ryll is another word for ka’athaira, a Vulcan lute

T’Ra

t’sai ho-rah

“lady of ritual”

T’Rama

t’sai rahm vakh

“lady bold thunder”

T’Ranneha

t’sai rahm nehayan

“lady decaying thunder”

T’Raya

t’sai raya

“lady refuge”

T’Rea

t’sai Reah

“lady of Reah” (ancient goddess of death and bereavement)

T’Rehu

t’sai rehu

“lady of the three”

T’Rel

t’sai reldai

“lady priestess”

T’Reni

t’sai reh-ni’rch

“lady three fires”

T’Resik

t’sai reh-eshikh

“lady of three deserts”

T’Risa

t’sai rishan-ha

“lady of vigorous survival”

T’Ruhi

t’sai run-ihn

“lady dense dream”

T’Rya

t’sai ri’a’gra

“resolute lady”

T’Saaf

t’sai s’afersu

“lady from the founder”

T’Saan

t’sai sa’yon

“lady from out of the fire”

T’Sai

t’sai

“lady”

T’Sala

t’sai salan

“lady wind”

T’Sanvi

t’sai sanuk vik

“lady pleasant well”

T’Saen

t’sai sa’wein

“lady from out of the cover;” i.e., from the pages of a book, from legend

T’Saien

t’sai sa’igen

“lady from out of the sky/heavens”

T’Sehn

t’sai se’heikan

“lady of the declaration”

T’Sel

t’sai selk

“delta lady”

T’Selis

t’sai zhel-izh

“lady of the snowline”

T’Sey

t’sai seo’a

“lady who asserts”

T’Shael

t’sai s’ha’gel

“lady from the light”

T’Shanik

t’sai shan’hal’lik

“lady loved at first sight”

T’Shenn

t’sai shen

“lady of ascent”

T’Shevat

t’sai she’rak vat

“lady of the eastern vault”

T’Sri

t’sai srikh

“lady of the srikh” (a unit of currency)

T’Syra

t’sai s’iraktra

“lady from the expanse”

T’Thelaih

t’sai thol-vai

“holy noble lady”

T’Vaakis

t’sai vakh’es

“lady of boldness”

T’Vei

t’sai vai

“holy lady”

T’Vel

t’sai vel

“simple/uncomplicated lady”

T’Velar

t’sai fel-ar’kadan

“lady rower”

T’Veran

t’sai firan

“lady support”

T’Vhet

t’sai vet

“lady of doubt”

T’Via

t’sai vi ha

“lady who is life”

T’Vin

t’sai vi ne’shau

“lady who greets”

T’Vish

t’sai vishizhukel

“foundry lady”

T’Vora

t’sai kuvoran

“winding lady”

T’Vran

t’sai-varan

“storytelling lady”

T’Vria

t’sai vre-ha

“life-vessel lady”

T’Vysse

t’sai visak’a

“lady legacy”

T’Zan

t’sai zan

“lady of the view”

T’Zora

t’sai zhagra

“lady of the game”