Kaiidth

One of the earliest concepts Surak taught to his followers was kaiidth, which is traditionally translated into Federation Standard English as simply What is, is. Another informal and more descriptive translation is Let go and go with the flow. If one looks for an equivalent in human philosophy, it can be found in the traditions of Taoism and the words of Lao-tzu in the 76th verse of the Tao Te Ching: “An army that cannot yield will be defeated. A tree that cannot bend will crack in the wind.”

He defined kaiidth in Part Six of the Second Analects, which you can read here: https://kirshara.wordpress.com/second-analects/

Vocalist and ka’athaira player T’Prion has put Surak’s discussion of kaiidth to music, offered here in this video. We hope you find it satisfactory. Below, you’ll find the lyrics in Modern Golic Vulcan and a translation into FSE.

KAIIDTH

Nam-tor nash kaiidth

Ken-tor hagik tanafsular heh teransular rata t’kaiidth.
Is-tor au ish-veh svi’fereikanlar rik hokni-nahp.
Veshtau ruhm dan-tanafsular kisheyalar.
Puhuplamau kras. Pupluhnkau masu.
Zatrasha ozhlar nayik kurayalar.
Tusa ein-tanafsular, dva-tor ta puyigahdau fereikan.
Hi nunau yeht-tanafsu kras-thezh,
masu-ulidar, il kuraya vi’bikuv.

Nam-tor nash kaiidth.

Trel-tor ozhlar t’teransu fi’ka’athaira
eh mavau sa-veh ralash-pitohlar ik ri wedzh-tor sa-veh.
Kuv vesht fa-wak saven-tor sa-veh teran,
lau aisha tchachaik’es fa’orensular sa-veh yar-kurau.
Hi kal-tor yeht-teransu ralash-pitohlar
kisheik kakhartau teran na’ek-uzh-kharat.
Nazh-tor ralvatif uzh-set’ko
eh nam-tor ish-veh weh-rom fna’riyeht-ralash-pitohlar.

Nam-tor nash kaiidth.

Fai-tor rom-masu-halsu ta kuv puk-tor ish-veh tehn’nepilash,
fa-wak shetau ish-veh maut-zungor heh mastevau.
Hi kuv ri shetau ish-veh pahthik,
fa-wak kup masu-hal-tor ish-veh na’vla eh fun-tor hagik na’gef.
Tvai kaiidth kal-tor hal-tor heh kal-tor lesh pilash t’ha’kiv etek.
Vun nar-tor etek ta fa-wak katau ish-veh etek
na’ridvuyan-masular wilat fa-wak
tihetilau ha-pavek k’ten t’urgam.

Nam-tor nash kaiidth.

WHAT IS IS

This is kaiidth.

Artists and composers easily grasp the concept of kaiidth.
They use it in their creations without conscious thought.
Even the best painters experience accidents.
Paint is spilled. Water is splashed.
Eager fingers leave stains.
Some artists weep, believe their work is ruined.
But the true artist fits the paint-drip,
watermark, or stain into the picture.

This is kaiidth.

The composer’s fingers slip on the ka’athaira
and he plays notes that he did not intend.
If he were teaching composition, his awkwardness in front of students
may cause him to turn green [with embarrassment].
But the true composer allows the accidental notes
to guide his composition towards a whole new direction.
The melody gains new interest
and is better for the wrong notes.

This is kaiidth.

The good swimmer knows that if he fights against the rip current,
he will exhaust himself and drown.
But if he does not panic,
he will be able to swim to the side and return to the shore with ease.
Kaiidth means letting go and allowing the current of life to carry us.
We must accept that it will bring us
to the still waters
where the situation will stabilize with less effort.

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